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CC Resolution No. 18-086 Adopting the SPARESOLUTION NO. 18-086 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CUPERTINO ADOPTING THE VALLCO TOWN CENTER SPECIFIC PLAN SECTION I: PROTECT DESCRIPTION Application No: SPA -2017-01 Applicant: City of Cupertino Location: 10101 to 10333 N Wolfe Rd APN#s: 316-20-080, 316-20-081, 316-20-103, 316-20-107, 316-20-101, 316-20-105, 316-20-106, 316-20-104, 316-20-088, 316-20-092, 316-20-094, 316-20-099, 316-20-100, 316-20-095 SECTION II: RECITALS WHEREAS, the Housing Element of the Cupertino General Plan identifies the Vallco Town Center Special Area as being appropriate to accommodate at least 389 dwelling units to be developed pursuant to a specific plan for the Vallco Town Center Special Area; and WHEREAS, the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan ("Specific Plan") has been developed pursuant to City Council direction to initiate a project to prepare a specific plan for the Vallco Town Center Special Area, including any required changes to the adopted goals and objectives for the Special Area, in order to implement the Housing Element of the Cupertino General Plan and to plan for anticipated future development activity; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the City Council direction to conduct extensive public outreach the City conducted multiple forms of public outreach including two multi -day charrettes, online civic engagement, open houses and brown bag presentations, comment meetings etc.; and WHEREAS, the Draft Specific Plan was released for public review in August 2018; and WHEREAS, the Specific Plan is part of the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan, all as fully described and analyzed in the May 2018 Vallco Special Area Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report ("Draft EIR") (State Clearinghouse No. 2018022021), as amended by the July 2018 Vallco Special Area Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report Amendment ("EIR Amendment") by text revisions in the August 2018 Vallco Special Area Specific Plan Final EIR document which contains Response to Comments to the Draft EIR and the EIR Amendment, and the August 30, 2018, September 11, 2018, and September 13, 2018 Supplemental Text Revisions to the Vallco Special Area Specific Plan Final Environmental Impact Report; (together, the "Final EIR"); and Resolution No. 18-086 Page 2 of 4 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan — SPA WHEREAS, the Final EIR was presented to the Environmental Review Committee ("ERC) for review and recommendation on August 31, 2018, and after considering the Final EIR, and Staff's presentation, the ERC recommended on a 5-0 vote that the City Council certify the EIR; and WHEREAS, following necessary public notices given as required by the procedural ordinances of the City of Cupertino and the Government Code, the Planning Commission held a public hearing on September 4, 2018 to consider the Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, based on substantial evidence in the administrative record, on September 4, 2018 the Planning Commission recommended on a 5-0 vote that the City Council certify that the Final EIR has been completed in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act, Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq., and reflects the independent judgment and analysis of the City, adopt the Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations, and implement all of the mitigation measures for the Project that are within the responsibility and jurisdiction of the City that are identified in Findings, in substantially similar form to the Resolution presented (Resolution No. 6860); and WHEREAS, on September 4, 2018, the Planning Commission recommended on a 4-1 vote (Liu: no) that the City Council adopt the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan, in substantially similar form to the Resolution no. 6863 presented, with additional recommendations regarding consideration of a middle tier Development Allocation for the Vallco Town Center Special Area as more particularly described in Resolution no. 6863; and WHEREAS, on September 19, 2018 (continued from September 18, 2018), upon due notice, the City Council has held at least one public hearing to consider the Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Cupertino is the decision-making body for this Resolution; and WHEREAS, after consideration of evidence contained in the entire administrative record, at the public hearing on September 19, 2018 (continued from September 18, 2018), the City Council adopted Resolution No. 18-084 certifying the Final EIR, adopting Findings and a Statement of Overriding Considerations, adopting Mitigation Measures, and adopting a Mitigation Monitoring or Reporting Program; and WHEREAS, prior to taking action on this Resolution, the City Council has exercised its independent judgment in carefully considering the information in the Final EIR and finds that the scope of this Resolution falls within the certified Final EIR, in that the aspects of the Specific Plan proposed in this Resolution that have the potential for resulting in either a direct physical change in the environment or a reasonably foreseeable indirect physical Resolution No. 18-086 Page 3 of 4 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan — SPA change in the environment have been examined in the Final EIR and therefore, no recirculation of the Final EIR is required; and WHEREAS, immediately prior to the Council's consideration of this Resolution, the Council adopted Resolution No. 18-085, adopting a resolution to adopt a General Plan Amendment to Development Allocations, the General Plan Land Use Map and development standards related to the Vallco Town Center Special Area, to ensure that the Specific Plan will be consistent with the City's General Plan land use map, proposed uses and surrounding uses as amended. SECTION III: RESOLUTIONS NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED: After careful consideration of the, maps, facts, exhibits, testimony and other evidence submitted in this matter, the City Council hereby finds that: 1. The Vallco Town Center Specific Plan is in the public interest and will advance the health, safety, and general welfare of the City of Cupertino; and 2. The Vallco Town Center Specific Plan is consistent with the City of Cupertino's Comprehensive General Plan (Community Vision 2040). AND THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That the City Council hereby adopts The Vallco Town Center Specific Plan as shown in Exhibit SPA -1, as amended by the errata shown in Exhibit SPA -2, and authorizes the staff to make grammatical, typographical, numbering, and formatting changes necessary to assist in production of the final published Vallco Town Center Specific Plan NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: The foregoing recitals are true and correct and are included herein by reference as findings. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: The City Council finds the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan is within the scope of the EIR and directs the Director of Community Development to file a Notice of Determination with the Santa Clara County Recorder in accordance with CEQA guidelines. PASSED AND ADOPTED this 19th day of September 2018 (continued from September 18, 2018), at a Special Meeting of the City Council of the City of Cupertino by the following roll call vote: Resolution No. 18-086 Page 4 of 4 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan — SPA AYES: Sinks, Chang, Vaidhyanathan NOES: Paul, Scharf ABSTAIN: None ABSENT: None ATTEST: APPROVED: Grace Schmidt, City Clerk Darcy Paul, or, City of Cupertino Vallco Town Center Specific Plan EXHIBIT SPA -1 Cupertino, California Public Review Draft August 2018 CITY OF CUPERTINO 4 9 E. Prepared For Department of Community Development, Planning Division, City of Cupertino 10300 Torre Avenue, Cupertino, CA 12345 408.777.3308 1 planning@cupertino.org For the consideration of the Cupertino City Council: Darcy Paul, Mayor Rod Sinks, Vice Mayor Barry Chang Steven Scharf Savita Vaidhyanathan Prepared By: Opticos Design, Inc. 2100 Milvia Street; Suite 125 Berkeley, California 94704 510.558.6957 1 info@opticosdesign.com With Consultants: CD+I, EPS, BKF, Siegman & Associates, Fehr and Peers, Depiction Illustration LLC. Specific Plan Authority This Specific Plan is authorized by California Government Code sections 65450 through 65457. The law authorizes adoption of a Specific Plan for the systematic implementation of an area covered by a local general plan. This Specific Plan implements the goals and policies of the Cupertino General Plan: Community Vision 2040 and provides additional detail to implement the General Plan's policy direction for the Plan Area. This Specific Plan serves as both a policy and regulatory document providing the goals, policies, expected outcomes, programs, standards and guidelines for future development in the Plan Area. Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Whit's Inside? Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Purpose and Intent 1 Background and Setting 2 Vision 3 Mobility 4 Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5 Development Standards 6 Administration, Implementation and Financing 7 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan iii jr ■IMUNIM111111IMMULI iv Vallco Town Center Specific Plan m.,%� -.rs � ■ t`l'�1 '`ti 9-' I I " 11! 7-- W W-0 --I L -LI III _�r�j 4, L:A o■r Public Review Draft — August 2018 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Purpose and Intent In this chapter 1.1 Purpose of the Specific Plan 1.2 Key Issues and Opportunities 1.3 Goals and Expected Outcomes 1.4 Community Engagement CHAPTER 1-02 1-04 1-08 1-16 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-01 1.1 Purpose of the Specific Plan 'Community Vision 2015-2040', the Cupertino General Plan, identifies the Vallco Special Area as an area to be transformed into a vibrant mixed-use town center serving the Santa Clara Valley, providing a destination for regional visitors and the local community for shopping, dining and entertainment. Policy LU -19 of the Cupertino General Plan ('General Plan') requires the preparation of a specific plan prior to any development in the Vallco Special Area ('Plan Area') to specify the requirements for land uses, design standards and guidelines, and infrastructure improvements. This Vallco Town Center Specific Plan ('Specific Plan') satisfies that requirement and is aimed at one overarching purpose: to transform the existing Vallco Shopping Mall site into a walkable, mixed-use district anchored by retail, entertainment and cultural uses, and supported by new neighborhoods, employment areas and public open spaces. This would provide a major new destination for Cupertino residents and visitors to socialize, work, and enjoy the shops, restaurants and streetscapes. This vision is the result of a comprehensive public design process with the Cupertino community in 2018. That process and the resulting community direction generated guiding principles that inform and drive the vision, described in Chapter Three: Vision. 27 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 Figure N. The Vallco Special Area, with the existing Vallco Shopping Mall. 1-02 Vallco Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 v :l'ml -�.lk!I # a_ 1.2 Key Issues and Opportunities Key issues and opportunities in the Plan Area have shaped the Specific Plan goals and policies. The 2018 Specific Plan process included extensive community engagement to identify the concerns and aspirations of Cupertino residents and workers, as well as analysis of the site and real estate market conditions in the region, to help define potential redevelopment opportunities for the Plan Area. This process identified six key issues. Each is described in this section, along with corresponding opportunities. These issues and opportunities informed the process and content of this Specific Plan. For more information on the community outreach and background analysis, please refer Section 1.4: Community Engagement and Chapter Two: Background and Setting of this Specific Plan. Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent IR -1 Nk 1 �in, n, 2 Regional Identity and Housing Needs and Relevance Affordability Lack of Usable Public Space Transportation Needs and Congestion Weak Connectivity and Public Realm Declining School Enrollment 1-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Issue 1 Regional Identity and Relevance Issue 2 Housing Needs and Affordability Figure 1.3. Vallco Mall, view from an interior parking court. The Plan Area has 1.2 million square feet of existing building area, of which 85 percent was vacant as of early 2018. The Hyatt House hotel was under construction in 2018. The regional indoor mall format for retail is increasingly becoming irrelevant because of a significant increase in online purchasing and the success of revitalized downtowns and new lifestyle centers in the region. Nationally, declining regional malls are adjusting to economic conditions by including a significant housing component; or are being redesigned as walkable, mixed-use developments. The Cupertino General Plan envisions the Plan Area becoming a regional shopping and entertainment destination and a place where people can live and work. By redeveloping the Plan Area as a mixed-use district, sales leakage to other communities can be reduced. There is an opportunity to accommodate the existing demand for more office space, in particular from the technology sector. - Integrate an optimal mix of housing, retail, office, lodging and cultural uses to ensure relevance to the community and market trends. - Establish a new walkable, mixed-use district for Cupertino that is a destination of choice for both residents and visitors. Figure 1.4. A 2018 survey (Data source: www.cupertinotoday.com) The Cupertino General Plan expects the city to grow by 22 percent from 2014 to 2040. This translates into 12,898 residents or 4,557 housing units needed over the next 26 years based on a household size of 2.83 persons. Currently, the Plan Area has no residential units on the entire 58 acres. Cupertino also has low housing affordability, with a median home value of $2.3 million and average monthly rents at $3,150 (June 2018 figures). The City's housing stock of approximately 21,500 residential units is approximately 60 percent single-family, higher than the Bay Area average of 54 percent, which limits housing access and diversity. The 2018 Specific Plan process studied scenarios that could accommodate significant amounts of housing in the Plan Area, including a base density of 35 units per acre, with opportunities for additional units through the state density bonus law or a city -defined "community benefits density bonus" available for qualifying projects that provide more affordable housing than otherwise required and other specified community benefits. The Plan Area can potentially meet 44 to 67 percent of the city's housing needs by 2040. - Allow and encourage a variety of housing types to accommodate a range of housing needs, including options such as co -housing (shared living). Allow both rental and for -sale housing to advance greater housing access. - Promote affordable housing at all levels: low, very low, median and moderate. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-05 Issue 3 Lack of Usable Public Space Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Issue 4 Weak Connectivity and Public Realm Figure 1.5. Vallco Mall: lack of outdoor open space. The Plan Area has no defined public space. The nearest public spaces, a plaza and park, are at the Main Street development 1,000 feet away. Portal Park is a 3.8 -acre neighborhood park in the North Blaney neighborhood to the west of the Plan Area. A boundary wall runs along the western edge of the Plan Area, separating it from the North Blaney neighborhood. The residents of the North Blaney neighborhood have expressed a desire to keep the wall and thus there may not be any bike and pedestrian connections across the property line. There is an opportunity to realize a variety of public spaces in the Plan Area to serve the new development as well as surrounding neighborhoods. - Create a network of publicly accessible spaces anchored by two main centrally located public spaces that can be new gathering places for the community. - Allow civic uses within the site to enhance the active use of publicly accessible spaces. - Establish standards to ensure that all public spaces are quality spaces in terms of size, layout, landscaping and other design details. Figure 1.6. Vallco Mall entrance from North Wolfe Road. The entire 58 -acre Plan Area has limited connections to North Wolfe Road, Vallco Parkway and Stevens Creek Boulevard and no routes across the site. This is a result of the superblock regional mall model with very large footprint buildings separated from streetscapes by large parking lots. The existing public streets within and adjacent to the Plan Area are large arterials primarily focused on the efficient moving of vehicles and less on the needs of cyclists and pedestrians. With the exception of street trees along Perimeter Road and parts of North Wolfe Road, the streetscapes lack visual appeal and coherence. The site offers an opportunity to implement the Cupertino General Plan direction of establishing a network of streets that will provide multiple routes to popular destinations and support all travel modes. - Establish a highly interconnected, fine-grained network of pedestrian -oriented streets and short blocks within the site, with connections to North Wolfe Road, Vallco Parkway and Stevens Creek Boulevard. - Retrofit North Wolfe Road and Stevens Creek Boulevard to promote walkability, transit and biking. - Highlight the street grid through the location of public spaces and design the new streetscapes to encourage walking and biking, and to create a coherent identity. 1-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Issue 5 Transportation Needs and Congestion Issue 6 Declining School Enrollment Figure 1.7 Congestion at commute times on the region's highways. The auto -oriented land use regulations and street designs of the past have left Cupertino with congested streets and few good alternatives to driving alone. Inadvertently, zoning rules have created strong financial incentives that reward employees and residents for driving alone, but withdraw support if they walk, bike, carpool or take transit. The result is too many drive -alone motor vehicle trips (which are a primary cause of air pollution and traffic congestion) and community fears that adding new homes, shops, or jobs will worsen matters further. The high value and large scale of the plan area offers the opportunity to establish a comprehensive transportation system that will give both employees and residents better transportation choices. - Establish a menu of solutions and measures such as vehicle trip caps and reduction of single -occupancy vehicle trips, that ensure that employees and residents can walk, bike, take transit or rideshare. - Use impact fees and development standards to build the civic transportation infrastructure needed to minimize traffic. - Establish mixed-use neighborhoods where future residents can choose to meet most daily needs without needing a car. Figure 1.8. A Cupertino school (Image source: wwwcusdk8.org) Cupertino's regional reputation for the high quality of its schools has contributed to high home sale values and rents. However, according to the Cupertino Union School District, enrollment in the district has declined by 3% from 2016 to 2017. Recent analyses show this trend increasing, resulting in a decline of 1,521 students in the school district from 2018 to 2023. Contributing to this trend are two key factors: lack of housing and changing demographics. Also observed is an increase in teacher turnover, in part due to the lack of affordable housing, that can potentially impact the quality of the schools. The Plan Area permits new residential units at a maximum base density of 35 units per acre, with opportunities for additional units through the state density bonus law or a city -defined "community benefits density bonus." This planned development can add new students, and consequently additional school fees to the district over the life of this plan. A project that applies for the "community benefits density bonus" would be required to make additional contributions to local school districts. - Better utilize and maintain existing school facilities through increased enrollment, and apply school fees generated by the Plan Area development to school programs and facility renovations. Retain teachers and school support staff by providing more housing choices. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-07 Figure 1.9. A walkable, mixed- use neighborhood provides shops and services within easy walking distance of most homes. Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent 1.3 Goals and Expected Outcomes In response to the key issues and opportunities described earlier, the five goals in this section frame this Specific Plan's purpose and inform its vision through corresponding polices and expected outcomes. To ensure tangible and effective policy direction of the Specific Plan, a summary is provided at the end of each goal to show how the expected outcomes for that goal address the six key issues discussed in Section 1.2: Key Issues and Opportunities. Goals Each goal addresses the key issues and opportunities by stating the desired situation or end condition to be reached. The goals are intentionally limited to keep the plan's focus sharp and realistic. Policies Each goal is implemented through policies to state Cupertino's position on topics that relate directly to achieving that goal. These policies refine the Cupertino General Plan's intent for the Plan Area so that outcomes can be identified and pursued. The polices are intentionally brief and limited in number to be meaningful and easy to implement. Expected Outcomes The policies that implement each goal are carried forward through a list of expected outcomes. This list is also useful to inform the implementation actions and zoning standards needed to achieve the outcomes. 1-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Figure 1.10. Providing adequate facilities for walking and biking promotes a healthier community. Q TABLE 1.1 HELPFUL TERMS _ The following terms have been used frequently in this Specific Plan to describe the desired quality and aspects of places and uses. They are described here for reference and clarity. Community -serving. Amenities that will attract people from within Cupertino and the region, such as 'destination retail', specialty and/or fine -dining restaurants, entertainment venues, special services, civic and cultural uses. Mixed -Income Housing. Development projects that include a combination of market -rate, workforce, and BMR housing. These projects often occur when cities seek to develop workforce and BMR housing units in addition to market -rate Neighborhood -serving. Everyday amenities such as cafes, units, and can either include public assistance or be done restaurants and services aimed primarily at the needs of by developers without public assistance beyond approval of entitlements. customers within an approximately five-minute walking distance. Below Market -Rate (BMR) Housing. Housing choices, rental or for -sale, that are priced below the prevailing market price. BMR for -sale units are typically made available to median and moderate income households. BMR rental units are typically made available to low, very low and extremely low income households. For more information on the City of Cupertino's BMR program and specifics of each income category, please refer to the City of Cupertino's website (http://www.cupertino.org). Market -Rate Housing. Housing of all product types produced by private developers on sites acquired at fair market value, without any public assistance or public involvement beyond approval of entitlements. Shopping Streets. The primary streets with ground -floor retail, entertainment, restaurant and/or other 'active ground floor' uses. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-09 a Goals r, Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent l3: srsai ►s-? ��Y� 1�I A Vibrant Mixed -Use District and Town Square 2 Improved Mobility and Adaptability,I I ��\Nfi _"r -1 - 3 A Network of High Quality Streets and Public Soaces 14 K f"4"_ i it AnHie):1411AU 1 W I AANK-M Diverse Housing Choices"" 5�1 Integrated Community Amenities E 1-10 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Goal A Vibrant Mixed -Use District and Town Square The core of the Plan Area is transformed into a compact and highly appealing mixed-use district oriented on a Town Square that is framed by shops, restaurants, entertainment venues and services. Implementing Policies 1.1 Allow the highest intensity of buildings and uses in the heart of the Plan Area. 1.2 Balance 'destination retail' and entertainment venues with neighborhood - serving retail and services. 1.3 Integrate uses such as housing, office, civic, and cultural in a manner so as to benefit from, and contribute to, the mixed- use quality and character of the Plan Area. a. The core of the Plan Area has a retail, entertainment and cultural focus with shopping streets. b. Shopping streets around key public open spaces are shaped by taller buildings and lined with active frontages at ground level - shops, restaurants, entertainment venues and building entrances. c. Vehicular traffic on Plan Area streets is intentionally slow in favor of a pedestrian -oriented environment. d. Street design includes wide tree -lined sidewalks, and allows street parking. e. Shopping streets immediately transition to high-quality mixed-use neighborhoods. f. The Town Square is located along or between streets with active ground floor uses. Key: © Issue Addressed FX Not Applicable ❑ ❑ 3❑ 0 © ❑ 1❑ Regional Identity and Relevance ®Weak Connectivity and Public Realm Housing Needs and Affordability Lack of Usable Public Space Traffic Issues and Lack of Mobility 5_1 Options © Declining School Enrollment Figures 1.11 (top), 1.12 (bottom). Images from Santana Row, San Jose. Diverse uses and well- designed streets, buildings and public spaces help to create an active, vibrant environment. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-11 Figure 1.13. Dedicated bike lanes increase safety for riders and drivers. Figure 1.14. A connected street network promotes multi -modal transportation. Goal Improved Adaptabil Mobility and qty Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Innovative transportation solutions promote walking and biking, eliminate or reduce potential traffic impacts, and increase mobility choices. Implementing Policies 2.1 Balance vehicular traffic with the needs of cyclists and pedestrians based on the intended physical context. 2.2 Fully interconnect the street network within the Plan Area to generate walkable urban blocks. 2.3 Design and maintain each street per the thoroughfare strategies discussed in Section 4.3 of this Specific Plan. 2.4 Manage on -street and off-street parking as per the strategies discussed in Sections 4.4 and 4.5 of this Specific Plan. 2.5 Enable adaptability to the future of transit and transportation. 2.6 Apply Transportation Demand Management techniques per Chapter Four: Mobility in support of the intended physical contexts across a variety of uses. a. Each street is created or retrofitted to support the adjacent blocks while serving its role within the network. b. Block lengths and pedestrian -crossing distances are short to enable walking and biking in response to the different transportation needs of the Plan Area districts. c. The street network, designed as a grid, provides multiple ❑❑❑3 ❑❑❑ routes to each destination. d. A Mobility Hub on site will complement planned transit improvements. e. The Mobility Hub is integrated into the street network and ❑2❑ ❑3 L ❑ complements the adjacent blocks and buildings. f. Mobility on streets adjacent to the Plan Area improves. g. North Wolfe Road is reconfigured into a multi -way ❑❑2 ❑3 0©© boulevard providing calm frontage streets along faster through -traffic in the center lanes. Key: © Issue Addressed Not Applicable 1❑ Regional Identity and Relevance ® Weak Connectivity and Public Realm EHousing Needs and Affordability Lack of Usable Public Space Traffic Issues and Lack of Mobility Options © Declining School Enrollment 1-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Goal A Network of High Quality Streets and Public Spaces The public realm consists of a completely interconnected network of pleasant and interesting streetscapes, parks, plazas and green spaces that generate a variety of unique physical places. Implementing Policies 3.1 Use the public realm to articulate the transition in physical character between the retail and entertainment core of the Plan Area and the adjacent mixed-use neighborhoods. 3.2 Coordinate each street and publicly accessible open space with the adjacent streetscapes and buildings. 3.3 Integrate existing trees, that are in good condition and where practical to do so, into new or extended streets and streetscapes. 3.4 Punctuate the Plan Area with parks, greens and plazas, each with a unique character and identity. a. Distinct streetscapes articulate the public realm for the various districts and neighborhoods within the Plan Area. b. Each streetscape is designed and detailed in support of the adjacent intended physical character and range of activities. c. Streetscapes integrate the sidewalk with the ground floor of buildings with little if any change in grade from the sidewalk. d. The Town Square and East Plaza generate identity and appeal for the adjacent buildings, especially the ground floor. e. Art installations and wayfinding are integrated into publicly accessible parks, plazas and greens. Key: © Issue Addressed FX Not Applicable ❑❑2 ©0❑5 ❑0❑ ❑❑25 ❑❑2 ❑3 0❑5 ❑ ❑2❑ © ❑5❑ ❑ ❑ ❑2 ® 0 5❑ ❑ 1❑ Regional Identity and Relevance ® Weak Connectivity and Public Realm Housing Needs and Affordability Lack of Usable Public Space Traffic Issues and Lack of Mobility 5_1 Options © Declining School Enrollment Figure 1.15. Plazas adjacent to restaurants and cafes allow outdoor seating. Figure 1.16. Landscaping enhances the visual appeal of streetscapes. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-13 Figure 1.17 (top) Madera Apartments, Mountain View and Figure 1.18 (bottom) the Fine Arts Building, Berkeley: A mix of residential unit types can promote housing. Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Goal Diverse Housing Choices The Plan Area and its neighborhoods offer a wide variety of housing choices for people of all income levels and abilities who live and work in Cupertino. Implementing Policies 4.1 Expect housing diversity and affordability at the scale of the neighborhood, the individual block and within most buildings. 4.2 Accommodate parcelization needs to promote ownership and rental opportunities, if required for financing or feasibility reasons. 4.3 Enable smaller and more affordable housing by unbundling parking requirements from individual residential units, allowing residents to choose to pay for parking, similar to their choosing a dwelling size or number of bedrooms. 4.4 Provide housing in the form of residential buildings as well as mixed-use buildings to support the intended context. a. Each residential block features a range of dwelling sizes.❑ © ❑3 ® Ifl 0 b. A variety of housing types is used to articulate building 1❑ ©❑3 ®❑5 0 massing and allow appropriate transitions in scale. c. Parking standards allow parking to be'unbundled' from housing cost. d. Housing is provided near or within employment centers to ❑ a increase the ratio of local commutes and promote the use of alternate transportation. e. At least 15 percent of the Plan Area's dwellings are BMR©�®©© units, with greater affordability for projects applying for the city -defined "community benefits density bonus". g. Teacher turnover in the local school district is reduced through affordable housing choices. Key: Regional Identity and Relevance ® weak Connectivity and Public Realm © Issue AddressedHousing Needs and Affordability Traffic Issues and Options Lack of Mobility FX Not Applicable F3] Lack of Usable Public Space © Declining School Enrollment 1-14 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Goal Integrated Community Amenities with Additions Development Key community amenities for all ages, including entertainment venues, parks and open space, and public art are integrated into the Plan Area. Implementing Policies 5.1 Incentivize community benefits to be provided through development by allowing intensity and height beyond the maximum base density through a community benefits density bonus program as an alternative to the state density bonus. 5.2 Locate community amenities within or adjacent to public parks, plazas and greens. 5.3 Ensure compatibility between each community amenity and the adjacent ground floor activities. 5.4 Include public art beyond the required amount, in a thoughtful manner to enrich the quality of the overall Plan Area, and each public space. a. Community amenities are located in the Plan Area as featured destinations. b. Civic buildings, when provided, are integrated into the walkable grid of streets and blocks, and provide visual emphasis through their architecture and siting. c. Standards for uses provide clarity about the types of compatible uses that can be near community amenities, public parks, plazas and greens. d. Public art is integrated into streetscapes, parks, plazas and other publicly accessible open spaces. Key: © Issue Addressed FX Not Applicable 0 2❑ ❑3 ® 5❑ ❑ IEM 5❑© 1❑ 2❑ © 0 5❑ 1❑ 2❑ ❑3 0 5❑ 1❑ Regional Identity and Relevance ® Weak Connectivity and Public Realm Housing Needs and Affordability Lack of Usable Public Space Traffic Issues and Lack of Mobility 5_1 Options © Declining School Enrollment Figure 1.19. Community and civic functions broaden the appeal of mixed-use districts. Figure 1.20. Public art celebrates the local character of the community. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-15 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent 1.4 Community Engagement The Vallco Special Area Specific Plan is the result of a robust community engagement process held in the spring of 2018. The Design Process At the Project Kick-off public meeting on February 5th 2018, the role of the Opticos team was figuratively described as that of a taxi driver. The community and stakeholders tell the team where they want to go (their values and vision) and the Opticos team, using their professional expertise, determines the best feasible route that leads to a long-term sustainable solution. Throughout the design process, the team presents optional routes or plans and the community and stakeholders provide input on those. Key to this process of getting feedback and refining design options were two public design workshops, or'charrettes'. Community Design Charrettes The community engagement process featured two community design charrettes to clarify and confirm the vision for the Specific Plan. Each of these multiple -day public design workshops sought to bring together community members, decision makers and stakeholders to provide input to the impartial multi -disciplinary Opticos team through a series of short feedback loops or meetings over the course of the multiple -day charrette. Through this charrette feedback process, the Opticos team narrowed down the options to present to City Council. Anyone directly affected by the outcome of the project, as well as those in a position to approve, promote, provide valuable information, or even potentially block the project were invited to engage in the design process. The following describes the six -step process for gathering information about the community values and vision. Q TABLE 1.2. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION: January - May 2018 For details, visit www.envisionvalico.org • 3,219 recorded public comments • 4,175 unique visits to project website • 928 in-person participants (interviews, formal interviews, charrettes, public meetings) • 152 hours of public access (meetings, charrette 'Open Studio' and 'Open House) 440 total registered users • 545 online comments • 7,446 online page views a 1-16 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent online input online input Project Kick-off and Existing Conditions Interviews - & Guiding Principles February 5, 6 Meeting - March 13 List of community Existing interests, values, conditions issues Confirm guiding • Understanding principles site issues, Performance context metrics Step 1: Listening, learning and building trusting relationships Public Kick -Off Meeting The Opticos team held a Public Kick -Off Meeting at City Hall on February 5th 2018 with over 150 people attending. Upon entering the venue, participants were asked to write their top three concerns or interests about the Vallco project on sticky notes (one per note) that they then placed, roughly organized by topic, on a wall in the meeting room to create a 'Vision Wall'. After an introduction by the Mayor, the Opticos project team made a presentation on the process and objectives of the Specific Plan. Participants then worked in table groups using maps to identify opportunities and online input Charrette 1 — April 9-13 • Public embedded in design process • 3-4 Plan Options • Buildings, public space, land use Renderings, physical 3D site model Street system, transportation, parking • Economic/fiscal impacts E Charrette 2 — May 20-24 • Public embedded in design process • Preferred plan • Buildings, public space, land use • Renderings, physical 3D site model Street system, transportation, parking • Economic/fiscal impacts challenges in and around the site. They then repeated the exercise, stating their 20 -year vision for the site. The comments were recorded by table facilitators on flip charts and by hand on aerial maps of the site. Every note was transcribed verbatim and posted on the project website. Interviews On February 6th 2018, the Opticos team held a full day of interviews with community members and other stakeholders. The purpose of the interviews was to begin to create relationships between the Opticos team, stakeholder groups, community leaders and others, and to learn about the varying viewpoints within the community. The interviews were not intended to poll the number of people holding different City Council Study Session — June 4 Feedback and discussion on: • Aesthetics • Mobility Parks and open space • Community benefits • Economic feasibility Figure 1.21. The community engagement process featured a series of feedback loops at key points for receiving public input, both in person and online. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-17 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Figure 1.22 (top left). The Project Kick -Off public meeting included a presentation on the team's role in the project. Figure 1.23 (bottom left). Table groups participated in an exercise to identify opportunities and their future vision for the Plan Area. Figure 1.24 (right). Community members wrote their top three issues, concerns and aspirations for the Plan Area to create a Vision Wall. viewpoints. Rather, they were designed to connect the Opticos team one-on-one with community members and build an understanding about the general dynamics within the community. The list of invitees to the focus group meetings was created by the Opticos team based on their discussions with people across the political and demographic spectrum. This list was created independent of the property owner and the City, and included only people who live and/or work in Cupertino. The interviews lasted over six hours with over 70 participants, representing a wide range of viewpoints including site neighbors, block leaders, pro -Measure C, pro -Measure D, students, seniors, faith - based and philanthropic organizations, parent groups, planning commissioners, planning supporters, employees of technology companies, renters, business chambers, local businesses and 'undecided'. In addition, Opticos conducted phone interviews with anyone who requested an interview. Step 2: Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles The Existing Conditions & Guiding Principles Public Meeting on March 1311 2018 marked the first feedback session of the Specific Plan process. The Opticos team presented its analysis of existing conditions and a draft set of project guiding principles based on the community input gathered in Step One. The guiding principles represent the community's values and needs and are one of the key measures used throughout the design process to guide decision- making during the charrettes. During the meeting, community members provided feedback on the guiding principles using polling keypads. The results of this meeting launched the community -wide input process on the guiding principles using a survey on the interactive website, CiviComment. All 1-18 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Figure 1.25 (left). At the Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles public meeting, the Opticos team presented their initial background analysis and preliminary guiding principles. Figure 1.26 (top right). Community members voted on preliminary guiding principles using keypads allowing for instant display of the polling results. Figure 1.27 (bottom right). The meeting also included break-out discussions with the team. Feedback was collected through written comments. online survey participants were required to register on the website, and agree to the rules of participation. Step 3: Charrette One - Plan Options Charrette One was held during five days from April 9th to 13th 2018. It began with a public meeting explaining the focus and desired objectives of the charrette. Over the course of the week, the Opticos team developed a set of plan options in response to the feedback and information received in Steps One and Two. The design intent was to test various options for street and block frameworks, street types, building massing, and public spaces, as well as initial thoughts on the program for the Plan Area. The plan options were analyzed and refined through feedback sessions with the general public as well as key stakeholders. Unique to this charrette was the use of a physical 3D model that was used to test various plan and massing schemes. This allowed the design team and the community members to get a better understanding of the scale and relationship of the buildings and spaces while working on the plan options. The feedback sessions included break-out discussions following the formal Opening and Closing Presentations and the Brown Bag lunch presentations; team pin-ups and the informal Mid -Point presentation, as well as Open Studio hours which offered opportunities to observe the ongoing work and to interact further with the charrette team. The impacts and trade-offs of the plan options were openly discussed and the participants could weigh in on which ideas deserved to move forward. The Opticos team then synthesized the best aspects of the larger set of frameworks and design ideas into two plan options, each with variations in program and design components. These were shared at the comprehensive Closing Presentation at a public meeting on the last night. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-19 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Q TABLE 1.3. WHAT IS A DESIGN "CHARRETTE"? ("Charrette" means 'cart' in French) In the 1800s, students at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris were assigned intensive, short-term design projects, that ended "en charrette" as proctors circulated a cart to collect drawings, while students continued to put finishing touches on their work. Applied to community design and planning, a charrette describes an intense, time - compressed design effort; peer-reviewed and community -critiqued. This 'co -design' process results in greater interaction between the design team and community at the critical design stages, to get comprehensive feedback and consensus for ideas and concepts. This focus helps to identify issues and resolve problems more quickly and with stakeholder input, resulting in creative yet feasible design solutions. In the more typical approach of first designing, then presenting finished results for review, the timeline is often longer, and can lead to re -work, coordination delays, and the community to lose interest. This can adversely affect the project's outcome. Figure 1.28. The charrettes featured a scaled model of the site, for participants to get a better sense of the scale and size of buildings and spaces. Figures 1.29, 1.30. Both charrettes included Open Studio (24 hours for Charrette One and 14 hours for Charrette Two), during which participants could view and comment on the work being produced. 1-20 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent 1 Figures 1.31, 1.32. Throughout the week during both charrettes, the design team generated graphics and pinned them up daily in the studio; reviewed comments from the community, and replaced them with revised versions in a series of three feedback loops. f Figure 1.33 (left). The 3D model was used to test and refine plan elements such as the size of public spaces as well as transitions in building form and height, such as at the western edge of the side, adjacent to the North Blaney neighborhood (Figure 1.34, right). Figures 1.35,1.36. Both charrettes featured formal and informal presentations that included break-out discussions with the design team. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-21 Figures 1.37 (top), 1.38 (bottom). Similar to the first charrette, the second charrette included robust discussions with Cupertino residents and workers that helped to inform the draft Specific Plan. Figure 1.39. A highlight of both charrettes was that community members had many opportunities for one-on-one discussions with the design team and experts on the topics of transportation, parking, form - based codes and economics. The results of Charrette One were a set of illustrative drawings and diagrams for each of the two plan options including site plans, framework diagrams, 3D renderings addressing land use and built form; as well as initial strategies related to transportation, parking and Transportation Demand Management (TDM), and potential economic and fiscal impacts. Step 4: Plan Options Analysis and Public Comment The results of Charrette One were posted on the CiviComment interactive web tool on the project website, and from April 271h to May 151h 2018, the community could comment on the plan options. During the time between the two charrettes, the Opticos team also conducted an analysis of the performance of the plan options according to the project guiding principles and indicators. The online feedback was analyzed by the design team and design modifications were made accordingly. Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent Step 5: Charrette Two - Specific Plan Elements Charrette Two was held from May 201h to 24th 2018 and broadly followed the same format as Charrette One, with fewer structured events. It started with an Open House on May 20th and an Opening Presentation at a public meeting on May 21St. During the public meeting, the Opticos team presented updated plan options that were developed after Charrette One in response to what was heard from the community. These updated options included modified program ranges and were supported by a preliminary economic analysis to highlight the trade-offs for providing various community amenities. The team clarified the objective of the second charrette - to take the results of the work done to date and start identifying and refining key elements that would be addressed further in the Specific Plan. It was made clear that the project objective 1-22 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 1 — Purpose and Intent q TABLE 1.4. COMMUNITY ISSUES AND CONCERNS The most common themes heard during the community involvement process are listed below. The complete log of community input can be found on the project website (www.envisionvallco.org). • Cupertino shares in the Silicon Valley housing crisis. The Plan Area provides a unique opportunity to provide more housing that is affordable to all income levels. • Many people are concerned about increased traffic from office and retail uses. There is a desire for more local retail. • There are concerns about the impacts of additional housing on school enrollment. • There is desire for public parks and green space. was not to design a particular scheme; but to learn from the various plan options to create a set of design rules that would guide future development in the Plan Area. Also presented at the charrette were strategies to significantly reduce traffic impacts though Transportation Demand Management; as well as a presentation by the Cupertino Union School District on the topic of school enrollment, presenting data and facts from the latest surveys. Over the next three days, community members continued to engage with the Opticos team during the Open House and Open Studio time. The Opticos team worked on testing and refining various design elements using the 3D model and computer modeling, and presented the results during the Closing Presentation at a public meeting on May 24t" Step 6: Post-Charrette Study Session with City Council The Opticos team, along with City staff, made a presentation to the City Council • There is a desire that the project be walkable, bikeable and offer transit options. • There is a desire that any new office space provide opportunities for local tenants including medical offices and providers of services. • There are concerns from adjacent neighbors about increased parking on streets and buildings looming over their homes. y at a public meeting on June 41" 2018. The intent was to give a brief overview on the results of the two charrettes, and get direction from the council on key topics that included Aesthetics, Mobility, Parks and Open Space, Community Amenities and Economic Feasibility. The feedback received at the Study Session, from the community, and from the Plan Area property owners have helped to guide the Specific Plan. Preparation of this Specific Plan The Opticos team worked with City staff to take all of the preceding community input and City Council direction to prepare the Specific Plan. The public review draft of the Specific Plan was released to the public in August 2018. Following this, the Planning Commission gave direction to City staff, supported by the Opticos team, in September 2018 and recommended approval of the Specific Plan. The final Specific Plan was considered and adopted by City Council in October 2018. Figure 1.40. Charrette Two included a presentation on the latest statistics on school enrollment by the Cupertino Union School District. Figure 1.41. Opticos presented key findings to the City Council at the Study Session on June 41' 2018. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 1-23 NO 1 h� f 1-24 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 d Background CHAPTER� and Setting In this chapter 2.1 Location and Regional Relevance 2-02 2.2 Competing Centers in the Region 2-04 2.3 Site Conditions and Surrounding Context 2-06 2.4 Access, Transit and Mobility 2-08 2.5 Bike and Pedestrian Networks 2-09 2.6 Built Form and Public Realm 2-10 2.7 Utility Infrastructure 2-11 2.8 Relationship to Existing Plans and Policies 2-12 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-01 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.1 Location and Regional Relevance In planning for the transformation of the Plan Area into a mixed-use retail, employment and entertainment destination for Cupertino and the region, it is important to consider the competing downtowns and established retail, 'lifestyle' and mixed-use centers in the region. Location and Overview The Plan Area is located in north-east Cupertino in Santa Clara county and is identified in the General Plan as the Vallco Shopping District Special Area. The Plan Area consists of approximately 70 acres, including 58.1 acres of developable area under the ownership of three different entities: Vallco Property Owner, LLC (50.82 acres), Simeon Properties (5.16 acres) and KCR Properties (2.12 acres). The Vallco mall is on the parcels owned by Vallco Property Owner, LLC, and the Simeon parcel is vacant. The KCR parcel has a hotel, Hyatt House, under construction in 2018. Figure 2.1. Location of the Plan Area within Cupertino. Figure 2.2. The Plan Area has direct access to Interstate 280 and at the intersection of two major roads: North Wolfe Road and Stevens Creek Boulevard. 3 The Plan Area has direct access to Interstate 280 via North Wolfe Road, an arterial that bisects the Plan Area. Stevens Creek Boulevard, one of the city's major arterials, runs along the southern edge. Adjacent areas consist of the North Blaney neighborhood to the west, an established single-family neighborhood with an elementary school and a park. Commercial and office developments east and north of the Plan Area include Cupertino Village and the recently constructed Apple Park campus. To the south of the Plan Area, are several retail and mixed-use developments including Main Street Cupertino and The Marketplace. '—c4 aYF § 2 1 Apple Park campus 1 2 Cupertino Village 3 North Blaney neighborhood 4 Main Street Cupertino rj The Marketplace r - -i Plan area (70 ac. approx; `--, 58.1 ac. developable) Vallco Property Owner, LLC (50.82 ac.) 4 _ r --J Simeon Properties (5.16 ac.) Q KCR Properties (2.12 ac.) 2-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting Role Within the Region According to the 'Vallco Special Area Real Estate Market Assessment, 2018' Cupertino has 60,000 residents, with an average growth rate of 0.6 percent, lower than that of neighboring cities. Cupertino's economy is fueled by the science and technology sector in Silicon Valley, and the city is the headquarters of major global businesses including Apple and Seagate. Other major employers include CRC Health, Mirapath, DURECT and DeAnza Community College. As of 2015, Cupertino had 40,000 jobs and a jobs -to -working residents ratio of 1.59. Cupertino experienced a 46.3 percent increase in jobs between 2006 and 2015. However, 93 percent of Cupertino jobs are held by non-residents. The'Vallco Special Area Real Estate Market Assessment, 2018' analyzed existing market conditions, recent performance trends of project types, pipeline projects and other economic data. A summary of the key findings is summarized in Table 2.1. For more information, refer to Section 2.2 of this Specific Plan. qTABLE 2.1. SUMMARY OF REAL ESTATE MARKET ASSESSMENT (2018) Office. Cupertino's central location within Silicon Valley and highly educated workforce positions it well for the office sector. Cupertino has added little office over the past decade, during which time the office inventory in Santa Clara county grew by 23 million square feet in response to the booming technology sector. The office market is strong, with a low vacancy rate of two percent, no projects in the pipeline, and lease rates above the county average. The Plan Area is extremely attractive due to its location and access and could absorb some of the demand for Class A office space from various businesses in the region. Ju Retail. Residential. Lease rates and occupancy Cupertino attracts many rates in Cupertino are high, families for the quality of discounting the Vallco its schools. With spiraling mall. Keeping in mind the housing costs in the Bay competition from established Area, the Vallco site has 'super -regional' malls and tremendous potential for 'lifestyle centers' in the region, housing due to its location, in order for a new retail- size and relatively simple dominant center to succeed ownership pattern. The in the current market, it must recently constructed Apple fit into one of two extremes: Park campus and ongoing luxury or value, with the economic growth in Silicon middle market struggling to Valley has further increased compete with online retailers. demand for housing in the region. The Plan Area has good location and access. However, for it to have a successful major retail component, it would need unique positioning that would complement, not compete, with the region's established centers. Analysis of the housing market suggests that the Plan Area can successfully accommodate a large number of residential units and support denser housing formats than currently offered in Cupertino. Figure 2.3. Apple Park, directly north-east of the Vallco site. With approximately 16,000 employees in the Cupertino area, Apple is the City's largest employer. Image source: Uladzik Kryhin, Curbed SF Lodging. Cupertino's hotel market is strong, with a high weekday occupancy of 90 percent. Recent construction may satisfy lodging needs in the short term, including the 148 -room Hyatt House hotel in the Plan Area, under construction in 2018. Existing hotels mainly cater to business travelers, and the market analysis suggests that well-positioned hotels (for example in the boutique or luxury categories) may be successful in the current market. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-03 Competition in the Region Within Cupertino's approximately 10 -mile trade area (a 20 -minute commute), competition comes from established centers - four within a mile of the Plan Area, and seven outside Cupertino - as well as from mixed-use downtowns in Mountain View (8 miles away), San Jose, Campbell (9 miles away), Los Gatos (9 miles away) and Palo Alto (14 miles away). The locations of these are shown in Figure 2.4, and descriptions of the centers are listed on the facing page. Figure 2.4. Competing centers within the Plan Area's trade area 2-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.2 Competing Centers in the Region erS F -A sy9h L� Palo Alto X. 10 11 Milpitas Mountain ViewNorth San Jose ------------------ >un ? r r7� « Cuper� 5 3 I 1 9 2 6, West San Jose /'I state Route 8S Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting Competing Centers within Cupertino: 1 Main Street Cupertino 0.5 mile away 133,000 square feet retail, 160,000 square feet office, 120 residential units, 180 hotel rooms. 2 The Marketplace 0.5 mile away 85,656 square feet retail with 30,000 square feet possible expansion. 3 Cupertino Village 0.7 mile away 113,200 square feet of retail with 25,000 square feet expansion approved. 4 Homestead Square 2 miles away 175,000 square feet retail. Competing Centers outside Cupertino: 5 Lawrence Square, Santa Clara 2 miles away 100,000 square feet retail 6 Westgate Center, San Jose 3 miles away 645,000 square feet retail 7 Cherry Orchard Center, Sunnyvale 3 miles away 45,000 square feet retail 8 Westfield Valley Fair, Santa Clara 3.5 miles away 1,415,765 square feet retail g Santana Row, San Jose 5 miles away 1,700,000 square feet of retail, office, hotel and residential including 615 rental units, 219 condos, 30 restaurants, 376,000+ square feet of Class A office space. 10 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto 15 miles away 928,600 square feet retail I 11 Great Mall, Milpitas 16 miles away 1,366,000 square feet retail Figure 2.5. Local and regional competing centers within Cupertino's 10 - mile trade area (a 20 -minute commute). Image sources: www.loopnet.com (2), www.yelp.com (3), wwwsbci. com (4), www.shopwestgatecenter.com (6), www.sanjose.org (8), www. tripadvisor.com (10). Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-05 1 Cupertino Village Shopping Center (12.51 acre site, 113,200 square feet retail) • The Hamptons residential development • Vacant parcel (owned by Simeon Properties) • North Blaney neighborhood separated from the Plan Area by a wall, with Perimeter Road and a row of trees on the Plan Area side of the wall 5 The last remaining businesses in the Plan Area: 6 Dynasty Seafood Restaurant 7 (5), Bowlmor Lanes (6), Cupertino Ice Center (7), 8 Bay Club (8), Cold Stone Creamery, Starbucks and Benihana 9 Local strip malls 10 Hyatt House, a 148 -room, 5 -story hotel (under construction in 2018) Ownership QVallco Property Owner LLC QSimeon Properties = KCR Properties Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.3 Site Conditions and Surrounding Context Figure 2.7 The Vallco sign Figure 2.8. The Vallco site in 1973. along Interstate 280. Image source: Niels Marienlund, Flickr 1955 Cupertino incorporates as a city 1960 Vallco Business and Industrial Park Figure 2.9. Interior of the Vallco Mall in 1977 created Image source: Niels Marienlund, Flickr 2-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 11 Apple Park, the new Apple campus (office parking structures along Interstate 280) The 80 -foot tall Vallco sign, visible from Interstate 280 13 Main Street Cupertino, a mixed-use development with a plaza; offices and the '19800' residential development 0 Apple offices Major Streets Interstate 280 [8 lanes, 65 mph, 158,000 ADT* (2018)] North Wolfe Road [4-6 lanes, 35 mph, 44,900 ADT* (2018)] Stevens Creek Boulevard, a major arterial connecting to SR 85,1-280 and Lawrence Expressway; [6 lanes, 35 mph, 25,000 ADT* (2018)] Vallco Parkway [6 lanes, 35 mph, 2,800 ADT* (2009)] Perimeter Road, a 2 -lane private street in the Plan Area Miller Avenue, a collector street * ADT = Average daily vehicles Source: Vallco Special Area Specific Plan, Transportation Impact Analysis (Fehr and Peers, 2018) 1967 1976 1988 2014-2016 2017 De Anza Vallco Fashion Major mall Main Street Apple Park College Park opens renovation at Cupertino campus established Vallco opens completed 1972 1987 2002 2015-16 2018 Stanford Westfield Santana Row Anchor stores AMC Shopping Valley Fair opens in San Macy's, Sears, closes Center opens opens in San Jose J.C. Penney in Palo Alto Jose close I ' Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-07 Major Streets and Circulation • Primary access from signalized intersections on Stevens Creek Boulevard, North Wolfe Road and Vallco Parkway • The private Perimeter Road provides peripheral access, and tunnels beneath North Wolfe Road to connect the east and west sides of the site. 2.4 Access, Transit and Mobility l� 0 WP 2 ■ ■ Plan Area Boundary Highways Arterials Collectors Local Streets Curb Cut Q Bus Stop QSignalized Intersection Portal Park 61" fla o Q ID Figure 2.10. Existing streets and circulation. Chapter 2 — Background and Setting pp C 0 C 0 600 1200 ft O 1/4 mile 1/2 mile 2-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.5 Bike and Pedestrian Networks 41, I� ' • g°% d r � Y-0.tib.. ••.. •. f .: . • ■ .. .. s• .; . 00 /•• o••• ■ •'o i�� •2 .. •• •. .1r • ;. • Portal Park • ;. i •.• . • •• •• 41, I� ' • g°% d r � Bike Infrastructure and Pedestrian Realm • Pedestrian and bike activity is low because of inadequate or missing facilities and safety concerns. • Planned Class I bike route along 1-280. • Existing pedestrian bridge over North Wolfe Road, currently closed. ■ - ■ Plan Area Boundary ■ ■ 1 Class I Bike Path (Proposed) t>_ Class II Bike Lane t>_ Class III Bike Route Q Trees - Parks Squares Blocks Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-09 gn 'W'111.. •. f s �� Portal Park '• : .� : .. .� is � / r••'w • i WiY�t��r• � • MIN° •N•N•• •• • ••M•• M Figure 2.11. Existing bike and 0 600 7200 ft pedestrian circulation. 0 7/4 mile 7/2 mile Bike Infrastructure and Pedestrian Realm • Pedestrian and bike activity is low because of inadequate or missing facilities and safety concerns. • Planned Class I bike route along 1-280. • Existing pedestrian bridge over North Wolfe Road, currently closed. ■ - ■ Plan Area Boundary ■ ■ 1 Class I Bike Path (Proposed) t>_ Class II Bike Lane t>_ Class III Bike Route Q Trees - Parks Squares Blocks Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-09 Building Scale and Public Space • Existing buildings are large-scale 'block -form' buildings two to three stories in height. Most buildings are accessed from the site interior, most building frontages and entrances do not address the surrounding streets. Public spaces are absent in the current layout, with available open spaces being used for parking and access. Figure 2.12. Existing sidewalks within and adjacent to the Val/co site. 2.6 Built Form and Public Realm IN A ��tile 4 -' mo - � o f 4 IN ■oo _; IL `� i s iMA r v,I 'i■v71�x� '�' y a, 1e r ti Jc4 urn Dr hill* CAN I. wa w 16 Al f�1 ■r. rit Dr� J ' r z 06 1�4 i1 T "AJ(! a►.i i t IWI a r i 7,/ S. s j IN T J' ' J % 7t , .LL 7.T Ai (Amherst Dr Portal Parki 9111.Ir III:.' . ! 7.'R 7, ' W' *.i 7. ' Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 1 L J�-- - av 40 ■! 7 r ...k 11L �' Wheat,,n JdV Dr — ------------- jar i;rfr•If ia�f4Yli1li• •��� w� ����A�' ,ICES .A.01.a: v° Figure 2.13. Existing built form 0 600 1200 ft and public realm analysis. 0 1/4 mile 1/2 mile 2-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.7 Utility Infrastructure Water California Water Service Company Wastewater Electricity Gas Fire Protection Police Protection Schools Library Solid Waste Disposal Cupertino Sanitation District Vallco Town Center Specific Plan (greywater on-site) Pacific Gas and Electric Pacific Gas and Electric Santa Clara County Fire Department Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, West Valley Division Cupertino Union School District Fremont Union High School District Santa Clara County Library District Recology South Bay Existing Utilities in the Plan Area Please refer to Chapter Five: Infrastructure and Public Facilities for information about existing utility infrastructure. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-77 Zoning The Plan Area is zoned as 'Town Center Zone'. Allowed Uses Commercial, office, lodging, civic, cultural and residential. Housing Priority The General Plan identifies the entire Plan Area as a housing priority site (Site A2 in the Housing Element). Figure 2.14. Existing zoning and allowed uses. Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2.8 Relationship to Existing Plans and Policies This Specific Plan has been prepared for the systematic implementation of the General Plan within the Vallco Special Area. The following discussion identifies key General Plan policies related to the Plan Area. Cupertino General Plan The Cupertino General Plan ('Community Vision 2015-2040') provides vision and policy direction through the year 2040. This state -mandated document provides the vision for Cupertino's growth and reinvestment by setting policy direction in a number of areas including land use, mobility, housing, open space, infrastructure, public health and safety, and sustainability. The General Plan is organized into 21 'Planning Areas': nine'Special Areas' and twelve'Neighborhoods'. The Plan Area, 'Vallco Special Area', is one of those nine Special Areas. Policy LU -19.1 states that a Specific Plan is to be created for the site based on specified strategies. The General Plan identifies a maximum of 35 dwelling units per acre in the Plan Area and it authorizes eligible projects in the Vallco Special Area to apply for a "community benefits density bonus" to increase the Plan Area's development potential (Figure LU-2'Community Form Diagram', page LU -17). In compliance with the General Plan, building heights and setbacks are determined by this Specific Plan. The General Plan identifies a citywide available allocation of 3,527 dwelling units (calculated at the base density) through i��■■■�General Plan Guiding Principles (Refer Develop Cohesive Neighborhoods W Improve Public Health and Safety Improve Connectivity 44 MFA M Enhance Mobility ME IIS Ensure a Balanced Community owow=_ Fit2 Support Vibrant and Mixed -Use Businesses allco Special Area Specific Plan I Ensure Attractive Community Design • Embrace Diversity • Support Education • Preserve the Environment • Ensure Fiscal Self Reliance Stevens Creek BIW Ensure a Responsive Government 2-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 2 — Background and Setting 2040, or 4,416 dwelling units through 2040 if the "community benefits density bonus" is approved. General Plan Strategy LU -1.2.1 (Planning Area Allocations) and Table LU -1 identify the following development allocations to the Plan Area: • Minimum 600,000 square feet of retail • 750,000 square feet of office • 339 hotel rooms, and • 2,034 dwellings Table LU -1 also authorizes 400,000 square feet of retail, 85,000 square feet of civic/ cultural facilities, 1,750,000 square feet of office, 339 hotel rooms, and 2,923 dwelling units if the "community benefits density bonus" is approved. Cupertino Municipal Code The Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) is the primary document that implements the General Plan. The CMC's zoning code provides the regulations for land uses along with development regulations and procedures for all land within the city. The Plan Area has been zoned 'Town Center Zone' concurrent with the adoption of this Specific Plan. This zoning designation establishes Chapter Six: Development Standards of this Specific Plan, as the standards for use and development within the Plan Area. If there are any inconsistencies or conflicts between the requirements of this Specific Plan and the CMC or other applicable regulation, policy or procedure, the provisions of this Specific Plan take precedence, control and govern the Plan Area. Other Relevant Plans City of Cupertino Pedestrian Transportation Plan First adopted in 2002, this plan was updated in 2018. This plan is designed to improve pedestrian and bicycling ' conditions through the City, and its vision is structured by three main goals: safety, access, and connectivity that look to enhance quality of life for all community members and visitors. This Plan shows the location and intent of shared use paths within and adjacent to the Plan Area. Cupertino Bicycle Transportation Plan This plan is designed to encourage bicycling as a safe, practical and healthy alternative to the use of a motor vehicle through identifying priorities for the next decade based on community direction. The plan's direction for the Plan Area is to install buffer zones along existing bike lanes. Other Regional Agencies CPA METROPOLITAN T TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC). The MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency for the nine -county San Francisco Bay area. MTC is responsible for regularly updating the Regional Transportation Plan, a comprehensive blueprint for mass transit, highway, freight, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities. ete Caltrans. The Plan Area is located in Caltrans District 4. Caltrans is responsible for the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the California State Highway System as well as the portion of the Interstate Highway System with the State's boundaries. Santa Clara valley Transportation it Authority Valley Transit Authority (VTA). VTA is Santa Clara County's congestion management agency, responsible for the design and construction of specific highway and pedestrian and bicycle improvements. The VTA has proposed the Stevens Creek Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project, which would provide service along 8.5 miles from DeAnza College to the Transit Mall in downtown San Jose. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 2-13 MMIMMMMI i EP -..K [lump r+JAV iaffiai I 1 �i �t��s� i�; ►.��� � cwt ��`� �R La Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vision CHAPTER In this chapter 3.1 Guiding Principles for the Vision 3-02 3.2 The Vallco Mixed -Use Districts 3-10 3.3 Vallco Places: Special Design Areas 3-12 3.4 Development Program 3-14 3.5 Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District 3-16 3.6 Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District 3-20 3.7 Office/ Mixed -Use District 3-22 3.8 Design Guidelines: Building Massing and Heights 3-24 3.9 Design Guidelines: Built Form and Public Realm 3-26 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-01 Chapter 3 — Vision 3.1 GuidingPrinciple A Vibrant Mixed -Use District Principles for t h e Providing Goods, Services and Entertainment for All Ages. Vision The community's vision for the Plan Area is shaped by six design principles.r The project goals and policy direction stated in Chapter One: Purpose and Intent helped generate these six design principles. The principles are intended toenerate a beautifulpedestrian- oriented, edestrian g ,p oriented, multi -modal and mixed-use destination with walkable neighborhoods, shopping and.9p f employment areas. '9 ❑ o :li _f_ Principle 4 Diverse Housing Choices For All Incomes and Abilities. 3-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Principle 2 Transportation Solutions That Support Walkable, Bikeable, Transit -Oriented Neighborhoods. Principle 3 Parks, Greens and Plazas Link the District's Individual Places. Principle 5 Robust Public and Cultural Amenities Create a Unique Identity. Figure 3.1. A visualization of the Plan Area viewed from Vallco Parkway looking west towards North Wolfe Road. Principle 6 Thoughtful Physical Transitions to Context. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-03 Figure 3.2. The combination of retail, restaurants and services on the shopping streets makes a place that appeals to a wide variety of people. Chapter 3 — Vision Principle A Vibrant Mixed -Use District Providing Goods, Services and Entertainment For All Ages The core of the Plan Area is anchored by two-sided shopping streets of neighborhood -serving, community -serving and destination retail, restaurants and entertainment. These streets are the primary feature within the entire district and connect with adjacent neighborhoods and employment areas. A Vibrant Retail Environment Vibrant retail environments feature one or several shopping streets that are compact in footprint - one to four blocks - with diverse businesses that make each street appealing throughout the day and evening, aimed at a wide variety of people. Retail includes restaurants as well as neighborhood and community services. In order to broaden the district's appeal and to ensure against the feeling of a mall, civic and cultural uses are included. Adding to the vibrancy of this place is the ability for people to enjoy the public realm - the streetscapes, parks, plazas and green spaces - without needing to make a purchase. When people think of a destination as a place to meet others or to enjoy being outside, the appeal of that destination is stronger and the variety of potential customers increases. 3-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Principle Transportation Solutions That Support Walkable, Bikeable, Transit -Oriented Neighborhoods Through a combination of Transportation Demand Management, an interconnected street network, and pedestrian -oriented street design, the Plan Area offers a wide variety of mobility choices. Many Transportation Options The Plan Area's thoroughfares, from intimate pedestrian passages to broad, gracious boulevards, make walking, bicycling and riding transit safe and comfortable for people of all ages. Protected bikeways and sidewalks, built-in traffic -calming measures, and safe, frequent crosswalks aim to substantially reduce traffic fatalities. Priority is given to space -efficient modes of transportation, allowing public transit and employer shuttles to provide fast, frequent and reliable service on major streets. Required Transportation Demand management (TDM) plans and enforceable vehicle trip caps create an environment where employees and residents can choose to commute by walking, bicycling, ridesharing, or taking transit. Public and private sectors work together, through public, private, and joint initiatives, to create many good transportation choices for residents, employees,and shoppers, resulting in a transportation system that minimizes impacts on neighbors. Figure 3.3. Connected thoroughfares make walking, bicycling, and taking transit feel safe for people from ages "8 to 80". Well-managed parking and loading keeps curb spaces readily available for shoppers and deliveries. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-05 Figure 3.4. Parks, greens and plazas are visually inviting, safe and interesting. Many wonderful public spaces are simple in design, yet succeed in providing visual interest and supporting a range of activities. Chapter 3 — Vision Principle Parks, Greens and Plazas Link the District's Individual Places An interconnected system of publicly accessible open spaces anchored by two key public spaces - the Town Square and the East Plaza - connects each of the district's places and enhances the identity of adjacent buildings and streetscapes. A Continuous Public Realm Connectivity is critical in ensuring that public spaces are well -used, which in turn helps to make them safer and more interesting places for the community. Further, an authentic public realm is one which anyone can access, use, and feel comfortable being in, for free. The district's public realm varies in response to each of the places it shapes but it is also one, continuous system of parks, greens and plazas. Each public space is linked to the others by the connecting streetscapes along individual blocks. The intent is to provide a variety of public places that can support activities for all ages and abilities. To create a central focus, there are two key public spaces - the Town Square on the west and East Plaza in the east side of the Plan Area. The physical beauty and character of each park, green and plaza is emphasized through the physical transition from the streetscapes that lead into each public space. 3-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Principle Diverse Housing Choices For A Incomes and Abilities The Plan Area offers a variety of housing choices: living in the core of the district in mixed use buildings, along the edges in more residential neighborhoods, or near and as part of an employment center. Variety At All Scales The variety of housing choices occurs within an individual block and to a lesser degree within a building. Housing choice also occurs through the size of dwellings: from very small to large. This is important in making an authentic place that is not segmented. Housing choices range from ground floor flats, lofts and townhouses in neighborhood areas to upper story flats, lofts and townhouses in the core and near or as part of employment areas. Some choices include being on or near a park, plaza or green. Further, housing choices are made available to more people by allowing the unbundling of parking from the cost of a dwelling. For those who want parking, they have the option and can pay for it while others who may not want any can put the savings to other expenses. Figure 3.5. Housing choices are integrated throughout the district, offering a choice of housing and a choice of location. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-07 Figure 3.6. The Vallco Plan Area will be a real place when people see it as many different things: a place to eat, a place to shop, a place to meet others, a place to continue education, a place to work, a place to relax. Chapter 3 — Vision Principle Robust Public and Cultural Amenities Create a Unique Identity The Plan Area includes a cultural dimension by encouraging uses important to the community and allowing a variety of new functions such as co -working spaces, an innovation hub for businesses, incubator and maker spaces, and educational uses. A'Real' Destination The Plan Area is an authentic community because it encourages the integration of civic and cultural amenities along with housing, employment, retail and entertainment. This makes it an attractive and convenient destination for residents and visitors who might be looking for more than shopping or dining. These civic and cultural amenities are intended to broaden the district's appeal, promote socializing, and bring customers to the shops and restaurants. A variety of amenities make the entire Plan Area a genuine destination of choice for the community. 3-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Principle Thoughtful Physical Transitions To Context The Plan Area is most intense in building size and scale in the Office/ Mixed -Use District, then in the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District west of North Wolfe Road, with buffers and transitions to the surrounding context, in particular along the western edge adjacent of the North Blaney neighborhood. Physical Scale and Character Within the Plan Area, physical transitions are made from one environment to the other by shaping the overall height of buildings, their distance from the sidewalk, and the different types of streetscapes. Generally, building size and scale decreases from the east towards the west edges of the Plan Area. Along the western edge of the Plan Area adjacent to the North Blaney neighborhood, effective physical transitions are made by requiring a transition buffer along the wall (that also retains the existing trees), and by ensuring that building heights and widths are regulated to create an appropriate transition in scale and form. Figure 3.7 Building width is as important as height in generating effective physical transitions between areas of very different intensity. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-09 3.2 The Vallco Mixed -Use Districts The Plan Area is a mosaic of three diverse districts, each with its distinct role and character. The districts share similar qualities of being walkable, mixed-use places and together, they create a cohesive identity. The exact location and extents of these districts will be finalized through an approved Master Site Development Permit. Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District Forming the core of the Plan Area, this mixed- use, pedestrian -oriented district provides a new shopping, cultural and entertainment destination for Cupertino and the region, with the Town Square as its central focus and with a variety of retail, entertainment, residential and civic functions in mixed-use buildings. Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District With a housing focus supported by amenities and public spaces, set within walkable streets and blocks, this district brings a much-needed housing component to create a true mixed-use community. The intensity of development is lower, with building heights transitioning to the lowest along the western edge of the Plan Area. Office/ Mixed -Use District Conveniently located adjacent to the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District, with good access to the freeway and major streets, this district has an employment focus, along with employee amenities and housing choices. The intensity of development is high, with the tallest buildings at the eastern edge, and around the East Plaza, the district's central public space. Chapter 3 — Vision oV Figure 3.8. Visualization of the Vallco districts: Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District (top), Neighborhood/ Mixed - Use District (middle) and Office/ Mixed -Use District (bottom). 3-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision IL Off ice/ Mixed -Use l - District 00 rift 00 00 woo 00 00 e 00 _ L romp Entertainment/ so Retail and Mixed -Use District tx �N Figure 3.9. The three Vallco mixed-use districts. .1 Please note that these illustrations are conceptual. i'. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-11 Chapter 3 — Vision 3.3 Vallco Places: Special Design Areas The Plan Area also has several 'Places': areas of special design focus, to create a unique identity. The design of the buildings and public realm in these Places has been given extra attention in the Specific Plan. Town Square and East Plaza The Town Square (A) in the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District, and the East Plaza (B) in the Office/ Mixed -Use District, are intended to be the two main public open spaces for outdoor recreation and activity. Built Character. The Town Square and East Plaza are framed by six to nine - story, and eight to ten -story buildings respectively. The buildings have active ground floor uses, including civic uses, if provided, to activate the open spaces. Public Realm Character. The adjacent streetscapes feature tree -lined streets, wide sidewalks, and active frontages with a retail focus. District Edges The edges along North Wolfe Road and Vallco Parkway (C) and Stevens Creek Boulevard (D) are defined by an environment of mixed-use buildings that are primarily residential, supported by ground floor retail and services. Built Character. Five to seven- story buildings line the edges of the Plan Area, with active ground floor uses. Retail is prioritized on Stevens Creek Boulevard. Public Realm Character. The adjacent streetscapes feature tree -lined streets, wide sidewalks, and active frontages. • Figure 3.10. The Town Square and East Plaza, the Plan Area's main public open • spaces. Special attention is required for the design of the buildings framing the open space and accompanying streetscape Please note that these illustrations are conceptual. C Figure 3.11. The District Edges along North Wolfe Road, Vallco Parkway and D Stevens Creek Boulevard. Please note that these illustrations are conceptual. 3-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Table 3.1. Design Intent: Illustrative Examples Q Design example: Town Square B Design example: East Plaza Image source: Townshend LA, John Sturrock Figure 3.12. Location of the Vallco 'Places'. Please note that these illustrations are conceptual. Vallco Gateway The visual 'entrance' to the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District, terminating the view from Vallco Parkway looking west towards the Plan Area. Built Character. The Vallco Gateway has mixed-use, six to seven -story buildings with extra attention to design and articulation, to define the 'entrance' to the district. Building corners are taller for visual emphasis. Public Realm Character. The adjacent streetscapes feature tree -lined streets, wide sidewalks, and active frontages with a retail and entertainment focus. C Design example: District Edge • Figure 3.13. Vallco Gateway at the intersection of Vallco Parkway and North Wolfe Road. Please note that these illustrations are conceptual. E Design example: Vallco Gateway Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-13 Chapter 3 — Vision 3.4 Development Program The current pattern of two superblocks, with large impersonal buildings surrounded by parking lots, is transformed into a beautiful pattern of walkable blocks and pedestrian -oriented streetscapes. Development Program The maximum allowable amount of development for the Plan Area is identified in Table 3.2 (Tier 1). As discussed in more detail in Chapter Seven: Administration, Implementation and Financing, a city - defined "community benefits density bonus" is available as an alternative to the state density bonus for projects in the Plan Area that provide specified community benefits in addition to complying with the standard requirements of the Specific Plan. Table 3.3 identifies the development capacity for the Plan Area if the City r Will Figure 3.14. To test out the development capacity and built form and other design parameters that should be part of the Specific Plan, various Plan Options were created at the Design Charrette One, two of which are shown here. Please note that these plan options are purely illustrative to indicate two of many possible build -out scenarios; they are not suggested as preferred design schemes. There can be many creative design solutions that satisfy the requirements of this Specific Plan. approves a project with a "community benefits density bonus" (Tier 2). In addition, the minimum required amount of public open spaces (parks, plazas, greens) under both development scenarios is identified. Transfers. Transfers are allowed in accordance with the requirements described in Chapter Seven: Administration, Implementation and Financing. 3-14 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision M& Maximum Residential (Number of units) Minimum Commercial/ Retail Simeon Vallco KCR Properties Property Properties (A) Owner, LLC (B) (C) 181 1,779 74 - 600,000 - (Square feet) Maximum Office (Square feet) Maximum Hotel (Number of rooms) Civic Uses and Public Open Spaces Minimum Civic/ Cultural Uses* (Square feet) Minimum Public (at -grade) Open Space (Acres) 750,000 - 191 148 None Required 6.0 i bonus"] Notes: KCR * If not used by civic and public Property education facilities, the space Total allocated for civic uses may (C) be converted into uses that 2,668 qualify under 'minimum retail requirement' or incubator/ co - working/ maker spaces. 2,034 600,000 85,000 for 750,000 339 6.0 Maximum Residential (Number of units) Minimum Commercial/ Retail subject to including Civic/ Cultural Uses* (Square feet) Maximum Office (Square feet) Maximum Office Amenity Space (Square feet) Maximum Hotel (Number of rooms) Civic Uses and Public Open Spaces Minimum Public (at -grade) Open Space (Acres) Simeon Vallco KCR Properties Property Properties (A) Owner, LLC (B) (C) 181 2,668 74 485,000 (includes - 85,000 for - civic/ cultural uses) 1,500,000 250,000 - 191 148 Public Review Draft — August 2018 6.0 Total 2,923 485,000 1,500,000 250,000 339 =MM Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-15 Figure 3.15 (above). The Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District within the Plan Area. Figure 3.16. Examples of mixed- use buildings with one or two levels of ground floor retail. The design intent is to make the ground floors along the main shopping streets visually prominent and distinct from the upper floors. Chapter 3 — Vision 3.5 Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District The focus of the Plan Area, the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District provides a new shopping, cultural and entertainment destination for Cupertino and the region. Please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards for design controls and standards. Physical Character This district is at the core of the Plan Area and its key features include the Town Square, a new public space, and vibrant shopping streets connecting with the adjacent Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District to the north. The built environment of this district is made of short, walkable blocks with large block -form buildings, approximately six - stories tall, each with a tall ground floor for accommodating uses that can include retail, restaurants, entertainment, lodging, civic, cultural and office. Another key design element of this district is the Vallco Gateway at the intersection of North Wolfe Road and Vallco Parkway. At this location, the corners of the block - form buildings have additional height to create an 'entrance' feature. Frontages such as shopfronts, arcades and galleries along the ground floor help in transitioning from the scale of the buildings to the scale of the pedestrian. Along North Wolfe Road, Vallco Parkway and Stevens Creek Boulevard are the District Edges, an area of mixed-use buildings with residential uses, supported by ground floor retail and services, in buildings up to five to seven -stories tall. The buildings may contain several floors of signature retail uses, in particular along Stevens Creek Boulevard. 3-16 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision The Specific Plan recommends that North Wolfe Road be reconfigured as a multi -way boulevard with calm frontage streets that are amenable to creating a mixed-use environment. Along these edges, the ground floors are encouraged to have active frontages, to create an attractive environment. Approval for the frontage street along North Wolfe Road is subject to a review, through an approved Master Site Development Plan. TABLE 3.4. INTENDED BUILDING FORM AND PUBLIC REALM ' Refer to Chapter Six for development standards Buildings are five to six -story tall, with taller buildings around the Town Square, and at the Vallco Gateway. Building heights decrease towards the western edge of the Plan Area, stepping down to four-story buildings near the west plan area boundary. • Buildings should have active ground floor uses, with shopfronts, gallery or arcade frontages. • Buildings are attached or detached. a • Buildings are at or near the sidewalk. • The Town Square is intended to be the main public open space. Other ped - bike connections include the North Wolfe Pedestrian Bridge and a ped -bike greenway long the western edge. • On -street parking is allowed in addition to public off-street parking. • If provided, civic buildings are encouraged to be sited adjacent to or near the Town Square. Figure 3.17 An illustrative view from Vallco Parkway looking west towards the Vallco Gateway at the intersection of Vallco Parkway and North Wolfe Road. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-17 Figure 3.18. An illustration of the Town Square framed by mixed- use buildings with ground floor retail, restaurants, entertainment and neighborhood services. Please note that the Specific Plan guides, but does not define the exact location and attributes of the Town Square in order to encourage creative design solutions. Figure 3.19. An illustration of a key open space and connectivity element in the Plan Area, the North Wolfe pedestrian bridge. This unique open space offers a practical route for pedestrians and cyclists across North Wolfe Road. Chapter 3 — Vision Public Realm The design of the public realm is intended to support the key function of this district: a destination for shopping, recreation and socializing. The streets form a 'shopping loop' and have wide sidewalks with shade trees lined with ground floor retail, restaurants, entertainment, cultural and other uses. The Town Square, located along or at the end of these active shopping streets, provides a large, active public space for many types of events or for simply enjoying the surroundings. that make them unique and memorable. Civic uses, if provided, are encouraged to Buildings are directly adjacent to the be located near or adjacent to the Town sidewalk to shape the public realm, or are Square to add a cultural dimension to this recessed just enough to make a forecourt district. 3-18 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision Figures 3.21 (top), 3.22 (bottom). Public art and creative building and roof forms can create a unique identity. Figure 3.20. The Town Square offers the opportunity to incorporate public art through simple options such as a bandshell or more dramatic, sculptural elements to create a sense of place. A unique element of the public realm is the North Wolfe Pedestrian Bridge that provides an important connection across both sides of the Plan Area for pedestrians and cyclists. This bridge functions as a publicly accessible space, with appropriate landscaping and small retail kiosks as amenities. Figure 3.23, 3.24. Images from Santana Row, San Jose. Kiosks and landscaping elements help create an active, well -used public space. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-19 Figure 3.25. Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District within the Plan Area. Chapter 3 — Vision 3.6 Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District The Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District is located adjacent to the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District, offering a variety of housing choices in a mixed-use setting within a framework of walkable streets and blocks. Please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards for design controls and standards. Physical Character Located north of the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District, this district features short, walkable blocks with medium to large block -form, four to seven -story buildings providing a range of housing choices. Frontage types such as dooryards, porches and stoops along the street and in building courtyards help in transitioning from the scale of the building to the scale of the pedestrian. Building heights step down towards the western edge of the Plan Area, in relation to the distance from the west boundary. Building widths are scaled and articulated to present'medium-scale' building forms and make an effective transition. Public Realm Streets in the Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District connect directly to the adjacent Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District and are residential in character, with wide sidewalks, shade trees and planting. Buildings are set back from the sidewalk enough for ground floor entries to face the street and provide opportunities for people to interact along the streetscape. Pocket parks and greenways provide public open spaces for the community. The existing double row of trees along Perimeter Road on the western edge of the Plan Area is preserved to the extent practical, or replanted; and a bike and pedestrian trail is incorporated. QTABLE 3.5. INTENDED BUILDING FORM AND PUBLIC REALM Refer to Chapter Six for development standards Buildings are approximately four-story tall along the western edge of the Plan Area. Buildings have ground floor retail in some locations, and feature dooryards, porches and stoop frontages in most locations. • Buildings are attached or detached. • Buildings are setback from the sidewalk. • Pocket parks and greenways are the public open spaces, with a ped -bike connection along the west edge. On -street parking is allowed in addition to off-street parking. 3-20 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision x Figures 3.26 (top), 3.27 (bottom). A physical separation at the west edge along the North Blaney neighborhood can be achieved in different ways: it could include a neighborhood street and a park (above); or a larger public green (such as a community garden) without the street (below). Figure 3.28, 3.29, 3.30. Dooryard (top), stoop (middle) and porch (bottom) frontages provide semi- private space for residents and 'life' on the street. Figure 3.31. Pocket parks and linear greenways provide open spaces at an intimate scale, appropriate for the needs of a neighborhood. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-21 Figure 3.31. The Fenwick & West building in Mountain View, CA. An illustration of a six -story office building with creative massing to break down the apparent size and scale. Image source: www. cpexecutive.com. Chapter 3 — Vision 3.7 Office/ Mixed -Use District A mixed-use district with an employment focus across the street from the Retail and Entertainment and Neighborhood Mixed -Use Districts. Please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards for design controls and standards. Physical Character This district primarily contains Class 'A' offices with some housing, lodging and employee amenities, continuing the character of the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District across North Wolfe Road. The central focus and main public open space of the district is the East Plaza. This built environment is made of walkable blocks with large'block-form' buildings ranging from six to ten -stories in height. The tallest buildings are in the north-east part of the district, and around the East Plaza, buildings can be taller than neighboring buildings to frame and accentuate the open space. Frontages such as shopfronts, arcades and galleries along the ground floor help in transitioning from the scale of the buildings to the scale of the pedestrian. Buildings 'face' the streets by orienting entrances, ground floor lobbies and similar active uses towards key streets, in particular those around the East Plaza. Along the North Wolfe Road District Edge, six to seven -story buildings have mainly office uses and active ground floor frontages to create an attractive environment and a prestigious office address along this major street. Along the Vallco Parkway District Edge, buildings are encouraged to be lower - scaled than the office buildings in the 3-22 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision district's interior, and to be mixed-use with residential uses above and active ground floor uses, 'facing' the street to activate it. Public Realm Streetscapes relate to the character of the Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed -Use District across North Wolfe Road, with buildings at or near wide sidewalks, with shade trees and planting. Buildings are at or near the sidewalk with shopfronts or large windows to create an active streetscape. Since this district has an employment focus, it is important to encourage and maintain public pedestrian access to key streets serving the East Plaza. The East Plaza is the main public space, and the focus of this district, framed by active ground floor uses. The North Wolfe Pedestrian Bridge connects the east and west sides of the Plan Area across North Wolfe Road and provides an opportunity for an elevated publicly accessible space. TABLE 3.6. INTENDED BUILDING FORM AND PUBLIC REALM Refer to Chapter Six for development standards • Building heights range from six to ten -stories, with the tallest buildings along the north and east edges of this district. Building heights are lowest along Vallco Parkway. • Buildings have active ground floor uses, and have shopfronts, gallery or arcade frontages. a • Buildings are at or near the sidewalk. • Buildings are attached or detached. • The East Plaza is the main public open space, along with the North Wolfe Pedestrian Bridge. • On -street parking is allowed in addition to off-street parking. Figure 3.32. Santana Row, San Jose. An example of an active, mixed-use environment with employment, residential and retail uses, anchored by an appropriately -scaled and well- designed public space. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-23 Figure 3.33. Building heights adjacent to the two main public open spaces in the Plan Area: the Town Square and East Plaza. - Tier 1 heights Additional heights for Tier 2 Chapter 3 — Vision 3.8 Design Guidelines: Building Massing and Heights The preceding sections describe the general character and design intent for the three Plan Area districts. In addition, this section covers guidelines for articulating built form and heights to achieve appropriate transitions to the adjacent context. Please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards for details and standards. Building Height Transitions The Specific Plan proposes building heights to be regulated for several reasons: to create a visual hierarchy within the Plan Area; to frame and accentuate important public spaces; to ensure privacy for residents; and to create appropriate physical transitions to the surrounding context to avoid the appearance of bulky, monolithic buildings. 15 , A system of height step -backs has been proposed to achieve an attractive massing envelope for the Plan Area, while accommodating the development program for both Tiers 1 and 2. The schematic sections below and on the facing page illustrate this concept for key streets in the Plan Area. For additional information on building heights, please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards. ----. 150' Building heights around the East Plaza Building heights around the Town Square 3-24 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision 4 60' 56' 75' 75' A ---- 120' Frontage Through Lanes Frontage 75' Figure 3.34. Height transitions: Sections for key streets in the Plan Area. Perimeter Road 75' B Stevens Creek Boulevard 150' 95' —.ill 75' C North Wolfe Road (North of Vallco Parkway) 151k 75' Frontage Through Lanes Frontage Frontage Through Frontage 75' 225' Lanes Tier 1 heights Additional heights for Tier 2 r - - L - - D Vallco Parkway i 75' Frontage Through Lanes Frontage E Public Review Draft — August 2018 North Wolfe Road (South of Vallco Parkway) Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-25 Figure 3.35. The public realm is a combination of interrelated elements. Frontage Space to window-shop Space to walk Space to sit or park a bike 1 Public open space Public art 0 Active uses within public spaces Chapter 3 — Vision 3.9 Design Guidelines: Built Form and Public Realm This section includes general guidelines for the design and function of buildings and the public realm that are intended to help achieve the envisioned form and character. Please refer to Chapter Six: Development Standards for details and standards. Physical Character • Extra design attention in terms of architectural details and finishes for the buildings facing the Town Square, East Plaza, Vallco Gateway, especially those facades most visible from streets leading to these places. • Variety and articulation of facades and massing, for upper stories of buildings, especially above the third floor. • A mix of private open space for upper stories of buildings (balconies, podium courtyards, roof decks, green roofs, etc). • A variety of active ground floor uses along streets to lengthen the 'open' hours for which the district is active. • Ground floor entries face the street or public space (as applicable). Access to upper story units is through ground floor lobbies accessed directly from the sidewalk. • Buildings incorporate design features and architectural elements to create active frontages, and for scale transitions from the building to the sidewalk. Residential buildings incorporate features such as dooryards, stoops, and recessed entries. For 3-26 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 3 — Vision commercial buildings such as offices and hotels, building entrances and public and semi-public spaces such as lobbies face the public realm. • Civic and/or cultural uses, if provided, are in unique buildings and face the Town Square. • Large shopfront windows for pedestrians to easily see into shops. • Bird -safe facade design. Public Realm • Short block lengths to increase walkability, extend the street network, provide multiple route options, and contribute to slow vehicle speeds. • Slow vehicle speeds to promote pedestrian safety. • Off-street parking, loading, and servicing activities located behind buildings or underground. • Public space is provided at ground level and at other elevated locations such as green roofs, building terraces, pedestrian bridges, etc. • Street trees provide shade while allowing views of ground floor shops and frontages. • The existing wall and row of trees along the west Plan Area boundary is retained as replanted if needed. • Sidewalks are wide enough to provide spaces to walk, to window shop, to sit and to park bikes. • Creative signage that enhances the ambience of the shopping streets. • Simple and durable street furniture that is functional and does not visually dominate the streetscape. • Public art prominently featured through its location and visibility. %} -m � v Lk Figure 3.36. The testing of building forms, building separation and open space parameters was done at the two design charrettes. Figure 3.37 The walkability of a place is determined by the quality of its streets and sidewalks in providing a safe, comfortable and interesting pedestrian experience, diverse destinations to walk to, and visually appealing buildings and facades. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 3-27 3-28 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan C Public Review Draft — August 2018 rMi Mobility In this chapter 4.1 Mobility Strategy: Purpose and Intent 4.2 Streetscapes: The Public Realm 4.3 Thoroughfare Strategy 4.4 Managing Curb Space 4.5 Parking, Loading and Traffic Reduction 4.6 Improving Transportation Choices CHAPTER 4 4-02 4-04 4-06 4-08 4-10 4-12 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-01 Figure 4.1. Streets are public spaces of limited width. To maximize their capacity to move people and goods, top priority must be given to space -efficient modes of transportation - to space for people on foot, on bicycles and in transit vehicles - when allocating space on streets. This is a matter of geometry, not ideology. The example shows BART's Station Access Policy. Image source: Patrick Siegman and BART Chapter 4 — Mobility 4.1 Mobility Strategy: Purpose and Intent This chapter sets forth transportation policies and standards. The essential aim of these policies and standards is to establish and maintain in perpetuity the transportation system necessary to support a thriving district where most employees, and many residents, will meet their daily needs by walking, bicycling, taking transit, and ridesharing. Walkability and 'Complete Streets' The future vision for the plan area is one in which users of the site, choose to meet their daily needs by walking, bicycling, taking transit, and ridesharing. Achieving this goal is fundamental to the task of creating a place of enduring value, achieving Cupertino's Climate Action Plan goals, and minimizing impacts on neighbors. WALKING 11 2Q A�/r, MM The public realm in the Plan Area includes a collection of different types of streets that play particular roles in circulation. A common feature for all the streets is that they should be multimodal and accommodate the needs of all users. All streets in the Plan Area are to be designed as Complete Streets, the attributes of which are described on the facing page. e[tiq Rad Feetler &n TRANSIT BICYCLE 11 44 4 A PICK-UP1 �� Jt—Pri—A.. ROP -OFF TTad VEHICLE PARKING =�v1Vh 4-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility TABLE 4.1. DESIGN FEATURES OF COMPLETE STREETS Example of a Complete Street with features that create an appealing, context sensitive, pedestrian -oriented public realm. A) Transit prioritization at intersections. Design intersections to help public transit run on time. B) Intelligent traffic signals. Designed to control traffic flow, transit, and pedestrian crossing safely and efficiently. C) Comfortable Bicycle lanes. Design bicycle lanes to create space for bicycles and protect them from moving cars. D) Minimum vehicular travel lanes. Reduce the number of travel lanes to provide traffic calming and enable wider sidewalks. E) Enhanced crosswalks. Crosswalks are designed to make the pedestrian experience safer and easier. F) Wide sidewalks. Design sidewalks for a comfortable pedestrian experience for all ages and sidewalk dining with the widest sidewalks on shopping streets. G) Street Trees. Select species that thrive in urban environments, Ei provide shade and beauty, and reduce air pollution. H) Smart Meters. Overtime, as parking becomes more valuable, consider electronic stations to manage parking spaces, and make paying for parking easy by basing price on use. 1) Green Infrastructure. Adds visual interest while directing stormwater directly to the soil to allow groundwater recharge. J) Ease of maintenance. Reduce the cost of maintenance for streets through selection of durable materials. 'Complete Streets' in the Plan Area Multi -Modal. Each street serves all users by balancing the needs of automobiles, buses, and trucks with those of pedestrians and cyclists. This is done in different ways and by using a different combination of strategies depending upon the use of the street and ultimately will provide many options for moving throughout the Plan Area and adjacent neighborhoods. Context Sensitive. Each street is designed to accommodate the different users while working within the existing or intended physical context of the area. Physical Appeal. Each street is designed integrally with the ultimate public realm in mind from the outset: shopping streetscapes, neighborhood streetscapes, or urban streetscapes. For additional information on Complete Streets, visit wwwsmartgrowthamerica.org/ complete -streets Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-03 Figure 4.2. "The design of cities begins with the design of streets. To make a good city, you need good streets, and that means streets where people want to be. Streets need to be safe and comfortable, they need to be interesting, and they need to be beautiful. They need to be places." Image source: 'Street Design: The Secret to Great Cities and Towns' by Victor Dover and John Massengale Chapter 4 — Mobility 4.2 Streetscapes: The Public Realm The Plan Area's image is largely shaped by the highly interconnected street network with a variety of urban streetscapes that share common attributes to promote walkability. A Walkable Streetscape Types of Streets The quality of the public realm in the The Plan Area has two general categories Plan Area will be determined by ensuring of streets, described further in Chapter walkable streetscapes, combined with Six: Development Standards. short blocks and public spaces. A walkable 'Active Ground Floor' Streets: To be streetscape has the following attributes: used in environments where an active is visually interesting and has strong spatial enclosure by the ground floor frontages and street -facing facades. is comfortable through short crossing distances, wide sidewalks with planting and seating, and street trees that provide a canopy effect for pedestrians. • is safe through the visibility from and to the inside of the ground floor, and by the pedestrian activity on the sidewalk. and typically non-residential ground floor use is required; such as retail, restaurant, entertainment, office and cultural. Neighborhood Streets: Streets in residential neighborhoods, similar to Active Ground Floor streets but with typically residential ground floor uses. 4-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility Figure 4.3 (top). Example of a street with an 'active ground floor'. Figures 4.4 (middle) and 4.5 (bottom). Examples of neighborhood streets. Q TABLE 4.2. STREETSCAPES: DESIRED QUALITIES 'Active Ground Floor' Streets Refer to Active Ground Floor Streets' in Chapter Six: Development Standards for detailed information. • Buildings have shopfront frontages with galleries, arcades, forecourts; and active ground floor uses. Umbrellas and awnings add shade and comfort. • Wide sidewalks with space for trees, walking, outdoor dining and display of merchants' wares. • Ground floor level generally flush with sidewalk. Small to no building setbacks. On -street parking. Neighborhood Streets Refer to 'Neighborhood Streets' in Chapter Six: Development Standards for detailed information. • Buildings have stoop and dooryard frontages with forecourts and some shopfronts. • Wide sidewalks with street trees. • Small to medium building setbacks. • On -street parking. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-05 Figure 4.6. Walking and bicycling should feel safe for people of all ages. Figure 4.7 Thoroughfares should be designed as both corridors for movement and as places to linger. Figure 4.8. Raised cycle tracks eliminate conflicts between vehicles parking and loading and people on bikes. Image source: "Sustainable Transportation in the Netherlands" Chapter 4 — Mobility 4.3 Thoroughfare Strategy To support a thriving mixed-use district with minimal traffic congestion, thoroughfares must achieve two fundamental goals: creating beautiful streets, where people want to be; and creating streets that efficiently move many people, in space -efficient forms of transportation, from walking and bicycling to fast, frequent and reliable transit. Direction for Thoroughfare Design and Operations Vision Zero In the design and operation of thoroughfares, protecting human life and health is paramount, and shall take priority over mobility and other transportation system objectives. Thoroughfares should be designed and operated with the aim of eliminating traffic fatalities and reducing non-fatal injury collisions in the Plan Area. Streets for 8 to 80 -Year -Olds Thoroughfares should be designed to make bicycling, walking, and taking transit safe and comfortable for everyone, whether they are age eight or eighty Sidewalks shall be provided on all thoroughfares. Placemaking Thoroughfares should be designed as places for dining, shopping and social interaction, as well as corridors for movement. Target speeds Design speeds for all streets should be selected using the concept of target speed. Maximum target speeds shall be 35 mph for Stevens Creek Boulevard, Vallco Parkway and North Wolfe Road, and 20 mph for all other streets. Transit & Emergency Response Priority On Stevens Creek Boulevard and North Wolfe Road, the City of Cupertino (City) will continue to prioritize maintaining transit speed and schedule reliability, and emergency response times, over single occupant vehicle movement, and consider using measures such as signal prioritization, queue jumps, bus -only lanes and bus bulbs and in -lane transit stops. Design Guides The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO)'Urban Street Design Guide', 'Urban Bikeway Design Guide' and the'California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices' (CA- MUTCD) will continue to be used as the design standards for thoroughfares. In the event of a conflict the City will determine the most appropriate standard. Performance Metrics New development within the Plan Area should be evaluated using vehicle miles traveled per capita (VMT per capita) as the primary metric for evaluating transportation impacts. 4-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility Figure 4.9. Features such as dedicated bike lanes make biking safe for all ages. Adjacent Thoroughfare Improvements New development may be required to improve adjacent portions of existing thoroughfares, including Stevens Creek Boulevard, Vallco Parkway and North Wolfe Road to meet the standards of this plan. Multimodal Transportation Impact Fee The project shall contribute the City's transportation impact fee for new development for improving all modes of transportation, including projects identified in the City's Bicycle Master Plan and Pedestrian Master Plan. Transit Assessment Transit stops may be located in the Plan Area. Figure 4.10. Bicycling is a social activity and bikeways should be wide enough to allow for riding side-by-side. Image source: Streetsblog Figure 4.11. Adding a low -speed side drive to North Wolfe Road can make it a fine setting for shopfronts. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-07 Chapter 4 — Mobility 4.4 Managing Curb Space The following apply to existing and new thoroughfares within and immediately adjacent to the Plan Area. Direction for On -Street Parking Design and Operations Priorities for Use of Curb Space In order to prioritize the use of scarce curb space, in general, the needs of the following uses should be addressed before examining long-term parking needs (shown in order from highest to lowest priority): 1. Bicyclists, pedestrians, and transit 2. Active freight and passenger loading 3. Placemaking uses, such as parklets and sidewalk dining 4. Short-term parking. Curb Parking That is Well -Used but Readily Available The City may provide the applicant the option of setting curb parking prices with the aim of ensuring that on -street curb parking is well -used, but readily available. Where necessary to maintain availability, the following strategies may be considered: • Implement performance-based parking pricing with rates that may vary by time of day, day of the week and by block. • Charge for parking wherever and whenever necessary - including evenings and weekends - to achieve a target occupancy range of approximately 65 to 85 percent occupancy on each block. • Use prices rather than time limits to maintain curb parking availability. • Net parking revenues may be used (i.e., after covering parking program expenses) to fund facilities and services that benefit the blocks where the parking revenue is generated. 4-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility Figure 4.12. Features such as parklets can add vibrancy and greatly enhance retail activity. Below 65% Within Target Range Above 85% • ■ • a Figure 4.13. Performance-based curb parking pricing sets rates at the lowest price needed to make parking readily available on each block. Figure 4.14. Redwood City uses performance-based parking prices: no time limits needed. Figure 4.15. Good curb space management keeps spaces available for shoppers. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-09 Figures 4.16 (top) and 4.17 (bottom). Employer shuttles give employees a stress -free commute, while bikeshare fleets provide a new option for workday errands and that last - mile connection to public transit hubs. Image sources: Genentech (above), Ford Goeike (below). Chapter 4 — Mobility 4.5 Traffic Reduction and Parking The primary purpose of the policies in this section is to improve transportation choices and reduce motor vehicle traffic, pollution, and traffic -related fatalities and injuries. The goal of the Specific Plan is to create while encouraging alternate means of a mixed-use environment that provides a transportation. Refer to Chapter Six: place for people live, work and play and Development Standards for parking also encourages residents, employees requirements. and visitors on the site to use alternate 3. Providing carshare and preferential modes of transportation. This is not only reflected throughout the Specific Plan but also in the mitigation measures of the adopted Environmental Impact Report (EIR) document. Project -level Transportation Demand Management Plans Developments within the Specific Plan will be required to participate in the Project Transportation Management Association (TMA) to create a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plan designed to achieve the mode share target for the office component and collectively reduce traffic for the entire project. Parking Standards The TDM Plan establishes maximum parking requirements to make alternate modes more attractive for residents and employees. In addition, the TDM Plan will be required to consider mode -share and trip cap targets through strategies including: 1. Unbundling the cost of parking from the cost of rents and/or sale price for residential and non-residential uses. 2. Optimizing the amount of parking provided, to meet the project's needs carpool spaces. 4. Providing a concierge service to users of the site to encourage alternative transportation. Additional TDM measures may be applied per the EIR's mitigation measures, MSDP conditions of approval and/or a development agreement approved by City Council. Parking Cash Out Each employer who provides a parking subsidy to employees could offer a parking cash -out program that gives employees who do not drive a cash benefit equivalent to the value of the parking subsidy. Free Transit for Employees and Residents Developments could provide passes for local transit service (for example, a deep - discount group pass such as the VTA SmartPass) to the development's residents and employees free of charge. Shuttle Services Shuttle service should be provided to employees, hotel guests, users and/ or residents of the developments in the 4-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility Plan Area. A community shuttle for users and visitors to the site that connects to other key shopping areas, high schools and to transit stations such as Caltrain is encouraged as part of a Community Benefits program. Shared Parking Projects may propose shared parking facilities, with the goal of an efficient use of spaces, between land uses, based on different times of peak parking demand. Parking Wayfinding Projects shall be required to develop an integrated way -finding system for parking facilities, including both static and dynamic (changeable electronic display) signage to provide guidance and real-time parking availability information. Mobility hub/ Transit hub A Mobility and/orTransit hub(s) may be located in flexible locations to accommodate future transit connections to allow for transportation choices. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-77 A Transportation Management Association can efficiently provide services like bikesharing (Figure 4.18, above), including electric bikes (Figure 4.19, below). 4.6 Improving Transportation Choices Chapter 4 — Mobility Large projects can successfully minimize traffic congestion, carbon dioxide emissions and air pollution by providing resources that play a crucial role to provide project employees and residents, as well as visitors and the community, with better transportation options. Transportation Management Association (TMA) The Project shall establish a Transportation Management Association (TMA) to serve employers and residents within the project. All tenants and property owners shall be required to join the TMA. The key purpose of the TMA will be to help office users of the project improve transportation choices and achieve the mode -share targets and keep within the trip cap. Key functions of the Project TMA shall include: Assisting TMA members in traffic reduction goals. • Creating and managing a coordinated shuttle service. Developing transportation services and demand management strategies, which may include but are not limited to carshare and bike share programs, providing commuter and resident incentives to use alternatives to driving, and securing funding from TMA members to support these strategies. 4-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 4 — Mobility A key function of a TMA is providing shuttle services including, potentially, autonomous shuttles like the ones pictured in Figure 4.20 (above) in Sion, Switzerland, and in Figure 4.21 (below) at the University of Michigan. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 4-13 4-14 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Public Review Draft — August 2018 rif rastructu re and Public Facilities In this chapter 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Storm Drainage and Water Quality Management 5.3 Potable, Fire and Recycled Water 5.4 Wastewater Treatment and Conveyance 5.5 Water Supply and Demand 5.6 Dry Utilities 5.7 Solid Waste and Recycling 5.8 Mobility and Transportation CHAPTER 5 5-02 5-03 5-06 5-08 5-10 5-11 5-12 5-13 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-01 5.1 Introduction A variety of public facilities and services are needed to support the development allocation proposed in this Specific Plan. Services include: water, sanitary sewer, storm drainage, solid waste disposal, fire and police protection, schools, library, and utilities. In addition, there are several infrastructure improvements required in the public right-of-way related to transportation and mobility. Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities Existing infrastructure is provided within public utility easements that run throughout the Plan Area by a variety of providers, as shown below in Table 5.1: Utility/ Service Providers. Removal and/or re-routing of existing utilities and associated easements will be required as part of plan implementation. Water California Water Service Company Santa Clara Valley Water District Recycled Water City of Sunnyvale California Water Service Company Wastewater Cupertino Sanitation District Electricity Pacific Gas and Electric Gas Pacific Gas and Electric Fire Protection Santa Clara County Fire Department Police Protection Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, West Valley Division Schools Cupertino Union School District Fremont Union High School District Library Santa Clara County Library District Solid Waste Disposal Recology South Bay 5-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.2 Storm Drainage and Water Quality Management Storm Drainage An existing public storm drain main extends north under North Wolfe Road, traverses through the existing Vallco Mall property on the east side of North Wolfe Road, continuing through the KCR property to its discharge point into the Santa Clara Valley Water District's Junipero Serra Channel that runs along 1-280 (near the 1-280 SB off -ramps) and discharges into Calabazas Creek, which ultimately drains to the San Francisco Bay. Storm drainage discharge from the Plan Area will be treated in stormwater treatment facilities designed for that purpose. The stormwater system for the Plan Area is shown in Figure 5.1: Conceptual Stormwater Management Plan. Rain water would be collected at grade throughout the project site and may be stored on-site in compliance with current Santa Clara county C.3 stormwater quality standards, at approximately the locations shown on Figure 5.1 prior to discharging to existing drains, ensuring that stormwater would meet all discharge and water quality standards. Other innovative strategies to ensure that water quality standards are met may also be included in the project. Specific measures will be defined in a project - specific stormwater management plan. From the site, rainwater will be discharged directly into the relocated public storm drain located in the public utility easement for discharge through the adjacent properties to the North and to the Junipero Serra Channel. Water Quality The Plan Area currently contains buildings, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces that make up over 90 percent of the total area which were constructed prior to the current requirements related to stormwater discharge. Currently, stormwater runoff discharges into drain inlets that convey the runoff into Junipero Serra Channel, and ultimately into San Francisco Bay, with no treatment prior to discharge. Stormwater requirements now mandate treating 100% of the stormwater runoff with Low Impact Development (LID) practices, practices, such as pollutant source control measures and stormwater treatment features aimed to maintain or restore the site's natural hydrological functions. These can include rainwater harvesting, re -use, infiltration, biotreatment, and green infrastructure, among others, or any combination of methods, prior to being allowed to discharge to the public storm drain system. Any future development will include the following features. During Construction The project shall comply with the NPDES General Construction Activity Storm Water Permit administered by the Regional Water Quality Control Board. Prior to construction grading the applicant shall file a Notice of Intent (NOI) and receive a Waste Discharger Identification (WDID) number to comply with the General Permit and prepare a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan that includes storm water quality best management practices (B M Ps). Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-03 The Storm Water Management Plan shall detail how runoff and associated water quality impacts resulting from the proposed project will be controlled and/ or managed. The Plan shall be submitted to the Director of Public Works for review and approval. The specific BMPs to be used in each phase of development shall be determined based on design and site-specific considerations and shall be determined prior to issuance of building and grading permits. Post -Construction 1. The project shall comply with Provision C.3 of the MRP NPDES permit, which provides enhanced performance standards for the management of storm water for new development. Prior to issuance of building and grading permits, each phase of development shall include provisions for post - construction storm water controls in the project design in compliance with the MRP Provision C.3 requirements, and shall include source control and on-site treatment control BMPs for reducing contamination in stormwater runoff as permanent features of the project. The project shall include a stormwater management plan that incorporates Low Impact Development (LID) measures such as bioretention areas, porous concrete, infiltration facilities, and water harvesting devices to reduce the pollutant loads and volumes of stormwater runoff from the site. The stormwater management plan shall be consistent with the landscaping plan and trees to be preserved. 2. To protect groundwater from pollutant loading of urban runoff, BMPs that are primarily infiltration devices (such as infiltration trenches and infiltration basins) must meet, at a minimum, the following conditions: Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities • Pollution prevention and source control BMPs shall be implemented to protect groundwater. • Use of infiltration BMPs cannot cause or contribute to degradation of groundwater. • Infiltration BMPs must be adequately maintained. Vertical distance from the base of any infiltration device to the seasonal high groundwater mark must be at least 10 feet. In areas of highly porous soils and/ or high groundwater table, BMPs shall be subject to a higher level of analysis (considering potential for pollutants such as on-site chemical use, level of pretreatment, similar factors). • Infiltration devices shall be located a minimum of 100 feet horizontally from any water supply wells. • Class V injection wells are not permitted. 3. BMPs shall be selected and designed to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works in accordance with the requirements contained in the most recent versions of the following documents: • City of Cupertino Post -Construction BMP Section Matrix • SCVURPPP "Guidance for Implementing Storm water Regulations for New and Redevelopment Projects- • NPDES Municipal Storm water Discharge Permit issued to the City of Cupertino by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region • California BMP Handbooks • Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association (BASMAA) "Start at the Source" Design Guidance Manual • BASMAA "Using Site Design Standards to Meet Development Standards for 5-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities Stormwater Quality - A Companion Document to Start at the Source" • City of Cupertino Planning Procedures Performance Standard. the City and the SCVURPPP to select pest resistant plants to minimize pesticide use, as appropriate, and the plant selection will be reflected in the landscape plans. 4.To maintain effectiveness, all storm water treatment facilities shall include long-term maintenance programs. 5. The applicant, project arborist, and landscape architect, shall work with owl �+ I4- - -. IIS■ ;II■ •..�.'. � -(D110 4!, I IF i IL Z ,�7�77 ter..W� ���;�•���* 1x16 a 4 J * z s ■ re y � i SM' �' a.rs I - 11 a= �•t�.� air W. ■� a rAub+ i�++►r gg 17`Mv"L — Mer' w i ritt Dr a r A i L 7�. ai,f ' ■ • •...� •... ti.... ti....+1 .� r a,a �.A a L ,• • • •1 r: u a'i AAL V' r i I 1 a,•. LEL ' '&:: A'tA i Lr'■' it �. R , Amherst Dr - - - .. r r iT �• Portal Park J * 7 .Ir ; 4 r * sry� r r a' a L ....�------ - - - - -' iR . Z a A L ' ■ r 7 r 16..M rm �#r1M1�Ow Wheaton Dr k0004 u011111111 MVaC ati c Stevens Creek Boulevard Hass 1PI���r 1{avfs��.Itl11�•A O 93 I IF ea �w�� �� q9al. OW Z 'a ,�7�77 ,•r�.a 1x16 a 4 20 a.rs I - 11 a ■ . ■� Q Rain Water Cistern Rain Water Collection at Town Square ■■■■� Existing Public Storm Drain to Remain ■ ■ ■ ■ Rain Water Collection at Grade Figure 5.1. Conceptual 0 600 7200 ft ■ ■ ■ ■ Municipal Recycled Stormwater Management Plan Water for Irrigation 0 7/4 mile 7/2 mile Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-05 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.3 Potable, Fire and Recycled Water Potable Water Public water lines are owned and operated by the California Water Service Company (CalWater). There are currently public water mains within a Public Utility Easement under Perimeter Road, Stevens Creek Boulevard, North Wolfe Road and Vallco Parkway to supply domestic water, fire water, and irrigation. Implementation of the Specific Plan may include rerouting of existing water lines and relocating easements. The project will utilize potable water from existing water mains. The new connections and water services will be designed to CalWater standards, and appropriate water meters will be provided as required by state law based on the type of use of that connection. Fire Water Lines The City of Cupertino and California Water Service Company have a combined public fire and domestic water system. All building fire water, including public hydrants along North Wolfe Road, Vallco Parkway and Stevens Creek Boulevard, and private hydrants on Perimeter and internal roads, will be served from this domestic water system and will be designed to meet or exceed fire code requirements. Recent flow data show that fire code requirements can be met without significant system upgrades. Recycled Water Recycled water in the project vicinity is supplied by the City of Sunnyvale's Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP). There is presently no existing recycled water system serving the Plan Area. The closest recycled water line is the Wolfe Road Pipeline, which currently terminates at intersection of Homestead Road and Wolfe Road on the north side of 1-280. In 2013, the City of Sunnyvale, Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), California Water Company (CalWater), and others entered into a partnership to extend recycled water service in the City of Sunnyvale south to a nearby office campus. Long-term plans call for the extension of this recycled water line across 1-280 to the intersection of North Wolfe Road / Stevens Creek Boulevard. Future development is encouraged to incorporate recycled water within the project and extend the Wolfe Road Pipeline to Stevens Creek Boulevard. The buildings and irrigation systems in the Plan Area will be plumbed to accept recycled water and accommodate the planned public recycled water system, if and when it is implemented. Santa Clara Valley Water District would be the wholesaler for recycled water, with CalWater being the distributer. If required by the Building Code, future development will incorporate on-site water recycling including rainwater harvesting and gray water use for facilities that can accommodate on-site water recycling such as, landscaping or re -use in toilets. Figure 5.2: Conceptual Potable Water Service Plan, identifies the planned potable water system and additional 5-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities facilities to accommodate recycled water for the Plan Area. may ■ o- 0 z oftinwo a i L whirs N IL it .La -*'rS}Ir . i! 1 V r It Aub+ r <y urn !i �Ir�:�K� Dr IS!►r Ir.�j� �rri'... � Y YM � 17% r��• Merritt Dr "i f .k I T Z 1L ' 1014 J 111 t'ILr IL i� ' •, A; i L 7�.L ji'' o- 7 7'!' If 7 i a 1 �•M M� ` is r Z':a r 1 7 'L < �' ■ i i,' v , r In r 1 , i 1 p IF - Amherst Dr 1 r r 9L ir do Portal Park J * 4 r i .4iR a 16 % i A " L til jr i t,d J. L PAb - ' I U40 ■ r 7 s I L 7. L <.L � m �- r �#rlMl+ Wheaton Drmirk �,••ti ' ■ moms ------------7xtx�x��clxx!z:• I a * 6- - 1 A NININNE Existing Water Service to Remain �l� < s �� jr •�:j.��f •�� w� � I►�; 2L- F .t• «3 � I� /r #y'-"� ' s ■ ■ ■ ■ Proposed Public Water Service p is ■ 0 �a�f4Yii�ltl� +a �9rL ! !'"7� J � 43233 y �• ' `� ■ •� Proposed Fire Service JA 16 aqz i le•�t p r t 't' t� /t` O' Backflow Preventers Figure 5.2. Conceptual 0 600 7200 ft ONE ■ Municipal Recycled Potable Water Service Plan 0 7/4 mile 7/2 mile Water for Irrigation Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-07 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.4 Wastewater Treatment and Conveyance Existing 12-,15-, and 27 -inch sewer mains in Wolfe Road collect sewage generated from the project site. These sewer mains run north on Wolfe Road to Homestead Road and then to Cupertino Sanitary District's (CuSD) Flume station where CuSD's flow enters the City of Santa Clara system to the Regional Waste Facility for treatment. The City of Santa Clara interceptor line has a peak design flow, permitted by agreement between CuSD and the City of Santa Clara, of 13.8 mgd and the peak 1 -hour flow rate is currently modeled at 10.7 mgd. Existing 12- and 15 -inch sewer mains in Wolfe Road and downstream connections from the project site are near capacity under existing conditions. The 15 -inch sewer system connects to a recently installed 27 -inch line at Wolfe/Pruneridge, which is operating at capacity. The newer 27 -inch sewer main ultimately discharges to the San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant, via the City of Santa Clara system. It is anticipated that upgrades may be required to the existing lines in North Wolfe Road to accommodate the projected flows from implementation of the Specific Plan. The Specific Plan EIR indicates that the existing 12- and 15 -inch sewer mains in Wolfe Road would have to either be replaced with new mains of an adequate size as determined by the Cupertino Sanitary District, or an 18-21 inch parallel pipe needs to be installed. The Specific Plan EIR also anticipates the replacement of the existing 27 -inch sewer main in Wolfe Road and Homestead Road with new mains of an adequate size as determined by the Cupertino Sanitary District. The estimated peak net sewage generation for the project is 2.38 mgd. If additional hydraulic modeling is performed on the CuSD system and the model indicates that the 13.8 mgd contractual limit through the City of Santa Clara would be surpassed by the project, future development would not be permitted to obtain building permits for any structures or units that result in the contractual limit being exceeded until additional capacity is available through the City of Santa Clara's sewer system; improvements are made to the CuSD sewer system that reduce the peak wet weather flows that enter the City of Santa Clara system; improvements are made on the project site that ensure the contractual limit is not exceed; or the completion of any combination of these approaches that adequately addresses potential capacity issues. There is also a sewer main located in the current Perimeter Road on the western edge of the Plan Area that collects sewage from the North Blaney residential community to the west and flows to the 15 -inch North Wolfe Road sewer main as described above. The existing sewer main on the west side of the property, and the main that crosses through the property from North Wolfe 5-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities Road that discharges through the northern The Specific Plan Wastewater Plan portion of the Plan Area may be rerouted is shown in Figure 5.3: Conceptual to avoid future building pads. If the main Wastewater Plan, including both new and is relocated, a new public utility easement upgraded sewer public sewer lines. will be required. pal � los 4 -Q) ■ *k ■ z ■i i i■i a = r ter■ ■■ M J * i s ■r!y 16 sM" Z t !i Cti�Y.4. rDr u rn ; 1 ur 101 IL J•b q Merritt Dr ~*zL _ J*1 t'i ii L 7. i ■ ...� �.............. 71' ift i a Z ,••• '� L i' ir ,� 't J j � 'r i • i P� Amherst Dr Portal Park 16 IP J * y r- I e Ur 5 iR ■ Z ijr ■rr' IF tJ1 s I J. L P "A 40 L I L 0. 1IsWheaton Dr ' Hass P Pearkep 'SAF 41, e IF 4i` tills 1496` ! _ !' At Figure 5.3. Conceptual 0 600 7200 ft Wastewater Plan 0 7/4 mile 7/2 mile mmmmmo Existing Sanitary Sewer to Remain Upgraded Municipal Sanitary Sewer ■ ■ ■ ■ New Municipal Sanitary Sewer ■ ■ ■ ■ New Development Sanitary Sewer Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-09 5.5 Water Supply and Demand California Water Service Company (CalWater) is the municipal water utilities provider for the Los Altos Suburban (LAS) District of the City Cupertino where the Plan Area is located. Water supply for the LAS District is a combination of groundwater from wells in the District and treated water purchased from the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD). Approximately 32 percent of supply comes from groundwater production and 68 percent from SCVWD. In a given year, the amount of groundwater production versus purchased treated water varies depending on the supply available from SCVWD. SCVWD imports surface water to its service area from the South Bay Aqueduct of the State Water Project (SWP), the San Felipe Division of the federal Central Valley Project (CVP) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) Regional Water System. However, Cal Water only receives SCVWD water from the SWP and CVP sources. CalWater has a contract with SCVWD until 2035 to purchase treated surface water and convey it to the LAS District. The SCVWD "contract" water is delivered through four connections within its transmission system. These connections are called the Vallco, Granger, Farndon, and Covington turnouts. Each of these turnouts is equipped with pressure and flow control devices that provide a hydraulic transition between their respective delivery main and the LAS District distribution system. Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities The LAS District owns and operates a water system that includes 295 miles of pipeline, 65 booster pumps, and 46 storage tanks. Cal Water proactively maintains and upgrades its facilities to ensure a reliable, high-quality water supply. As described in the Vallco Special Area Specific Plan EIR ('Specific Plan EIR'), Plan Area development would result in a maximum net increase in water demand of 249 AFY compared to existing 2015 water demand on-site. Based on projected supply, LAS District is anticipated to meet projected demand during normal, single dry, and multiple dry year conditions. The future development is encouraged to incorporate on-site water recycling including rainwater harvesting and gray water use for facilities that can accommodate on-site water recycling such as landscaping, or re -use in toilets. 5-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.6 Dry Utilities Central Plant A central plant or distributed plants may be constructed within the Plan Area to centralize heating and cooling for the project. Any externally visible mechanical equipment would be screened from public views by preferably integrating such equipment into proposed buildings or placing them underground or, less preferably, by screening them with screens that are at least as tall as the equipment it Is screening. In addition, mechanical equipment shall be required to incorporate noise reduction measures in accordance with the Cupertino Municipal Code and the Specific Plan's MMRP to reduce impacts on surrounding uses. Energy Infrastructure: Gas and Electric Lines and Gasoline The operational energy demand at build out for the Plan Area is estimated to be approximately 72 net gigawatt -hours (GWh) of electricity per year, 75 net billion British thermal units (Btu) of natural gas per year, and 11,900 gallons of gasoline per year compared to existing conditions. Public gas and electric facilities are owned and operated by Pacific Gas and Electric. Existing (PG&E) gas and high voltage electric lines are located in North Wolfe Road, running from north to south. As analyzed in the Specific Plan EIR, proposed development will not use energy or fuel in a wasteful manner. Therefore, there are no anticipated changes to the location of these existing facilities, and it is believed that existing facilities will be adequate to meet future demand. However, PG&E will need to review proposed project loads and determine if upgrades to the system are necessary to serve the project in conjunction with subsequent development applications in the Plan Area. There is also a public joint trench along the southwest section of the existing Perimeter Road, including natural gas, communications and electrical that may need to be relocated out of future building pads. Even though the existing and/or upgraded PG&E infrastructure will be utilized to provide electricity to the project, electricity for future development shall be provided by Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) or another provider that sources electricity from 100 percent carbon free sources in order to comply with the regional Climate Action Plan consistency. Future developers are required to indicate how compliance with this requirement will be achieved by project users. Communication Lines Existing public communication lines run underground on the east side of North Wolfe Road from north to south. There are no proposed changes to the location of these facilities. Upgrades to these facilities will be necessary to support the users of the site, and the communication lines may need to be rerouted to ensure availability of the lines during construction or to avoid other required utilities based on final approved construction plans within the Plan Area. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-77 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.7 Solid Waste and Recycling Recology South Bay is the exclusive franchise company that currently provides curbside recycling, garbage, and yard waste services to the City of Cupertino. It would continue to provide solid waste and recycling service to the Plan Area, subject to change by the City of Cupertino per state and local requirements and/or agreements. The City shall continue its current recycling ordinances and zero waste policies in an effort to further increase its diversion rate and lower its per capita disposal rate. The City will impose conditions of approval on future development in the Plan Area to implement these policies, and it may require solid waste technologies such as pneumatic collection, advanced treatment such as anaerobic digestion to help reduce the amount of solid waste being exported from the Plan Area, or other implementation mechanisms. In addition, development within the Plan Area is subject to Chapter 16.72 of the Cupertino Municipal Code regarding recycling and diversion of waste during construction and demolition to reduce the total amount of waste that will be landfilled. 5-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 5 — Infrastructure and Public Facilities 5.8 Mobility and Transportation Build out of the Plan Area will require new internal streets, including enhanced bicycle and pedestrian facilities. New development shall be required to improve adjacent portions of existing thoroughfares, including Stevens Creek Boulevard, Vallco Parkway, and North Wolfe Road. The proposed street network, along with right-of-way improvement requirements, is illustrated and discussed in Chapter Six: Development Standards. In addition to improvements within the Plan Area, the development projects authorized by this Specific Plan are considered to be projects of regional significance. Therefore, there are several improvements that are required to maintain the transportation infrastructure in the vicinity of the project site in compliance with City standards. In addition, the Specific Plan requires further transportation management measures to reduce trip generation within the Plan Area. These include: 1. Fair -share contribution towards the City's cost of the 1-280/ North Wolfe Road interchange project. 2. Implementation of the conditions of approval, standard permit conditions, and mitigations identified in the certified Specific Plan EIR. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 5-13 � I el,11,11 k54t i Development Standards In this chapter 6.1 Town Center Zone 6.2 Zone Standards 6.3 Definitions CHAPTER 6 6-03 6-07 6-67 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-01 6-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 6.1: Town Center Zone Table of Contents 6.1.1 Purpose and Intent 6-05 6.1.101 Purpose and Intent........................................................................6-05 6.1.102 Applicability..............................................................................6-05 Figure 6.1.102.A: Town Center Code Boundaries..............................................6-05 6.1.103 Town Center Zone Established............................................................6-06 6.1.104 Administration and Procedures............................................................6-06 Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-03 Town Center Zone This page intentionally left blank 6-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.1.1 Purpose and Intent 6.1.101 Purpose and Intent This Chapter sets forth standards for building form, streetscapes and uses. These standards are also referred to as the Town Center Code or "Code". A. This Chapter implements the policy direction set forth in the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan to create a vibrant Town Center. The standards regulate buildings, streets, and open spaces that create a variety of walkable environments: 1. Vibrant pedestrian -oriented streets lined with active uses and a mix of uses above the ground floor, 2. Vibrant public open spaces lined by an active ground floor and a mix of uses; and 3. Neighborhood streets. B. The Code provides standards that apply throughout the Code Boundaries identified in Figure 6.1.102.A (Town Center Code Boundaries) and provides specific standards based on the intended form and character. 6.1.102 Applicability The standards in this Chapter apply to all development and improvements within the Code Boundaries identified in Figure 6.1.102.A (Town Center Code Boundaries) show below. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-05 6.1.103 1 Town Center Zone Established 6.1.103 Town Center Zone Established This Section establishes standards to implement the vision described in Chapter 3 (Vision) of the Specific Plan. The standards of the Town Center Zone are applied to the parcels within the Code boundaries identified in Figure 6.1.102.A (Town Center Code Boundaries). 6.1.104 Administration and Procedures A. Development proposals are to be reviewed and processed per the procedures in Chapter 7 (Administration, Implementation and Financing) of the Specific Plan. B. Where references are made to the "City", City means the applicable department(s) of the City of Cupertino. 6-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2: Zone Standards Table of Contents 6.2.1 Regulating Plan 6-09 6.2.101 Form and Character District Regulating Plan................................................6-09 Figure 6.2.101.A: Form and Character District Regulating Plan.................................6-09 6.2.102 Standards by Form and Character District .................................................. 6-10 Table 6.2.102.A: Standards by Form and Character District ................................... 6-10 6.2.2 Town Center Zone Standards 6-13 6.2.201 Street and Block Network................................................................. 6-13 Figure 6.2.201.A: Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan ....................... 6-15 6.2.202 Open Space.............................................................................. 6-27 Figure 6.2.202.A: Conceptual Open Space Regulating Plan ................................... 6-29 6.2.203 Building Height...........................................................................6-36 Screening................................................................................6-56 Table 6.2.203.A: Height Limits.............................................................. 6-36 6.2.209 Figure 6.2.203.A: Building Height Regulating Plan ............................................ 6-37 6.2.204 Facade Articulation.......................................................................6-38 6.2.210 Table 6.2.204.A: Facade Articulation........................................................ 6-38 6.2.205 Frontages................................................................................6-39 6.2.206 Uses.....................................................................................6-48 Public Review Table 6.2.206.A: Allowed Land Uses ........................................................ 6-48 6.2.207 Parking...................................................................................6-52 Table 6.2.207.A: Parking Spaces Requirements ............................................... 6-52 Table: 6.2.207.B: Required Carshare Parking Spaces .......................................... 6-53 6.2.208 Screening................................................................................6-56 6.2.209 Bird -safe Design..........................................................................6-58 6.2.210 Outdoor Lighting.........................................................................6-58 6.2.211 Signage..................................................................................6-59 Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-07 Zone Standards 6-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Form and Character District Regulating Plan 1 6.2.101 6.2.1 Regulating Plan 6.2.101 Form and Character District Regulating Plan The Town Center Zone applies standards for development and uses through form and character districts as identified in Figure 6.2.101.A (Form and Character District Regulating Plan). stdr P28O vcri>c�e�c rnvu L L 6 Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-09 6.2.102 1 Standards by Form and Character District 6.2.102 Standards by Form and Character District StandardsTable 6.2.102.A: Requirements Neighborhood/ Mixed Use Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Retail and Entertainment/ Office/ Additional Mixed Use Mixed Use Standards 1.131ock Size Block Face Length 250' to 500'' 250' to 500'' 250' to 500'' Block Perimeter 1,800'max. 1,800'max. 2,400'max. 'When a Paseo is applied mid block, the block face may be up to 650' in length. 2.Open Space: Figure 6.2.202.A Greenway Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.202.A.1 Neighborhood Park Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.202.A.2 Plaza/Square Not Allowed Required Required' See 6.2.202.A.3 Pedestrian Bridge Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.202.A.4 Pocket Plaza/Park Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.202.A.5 ' Building height is required to be modified adjacent to this open space See 6.2.203.D 3.Streets Figure 6.2.201.A Neighborhood Street Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.201.A.1 Active Ground Floor Street Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.201.A.2 Paseo Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.201.A.3 Service Lane Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.201.A.4 North Wolfe Road (North of Vallco Parkway) Required (West) Required (West) Required (East) See 6.2.201.B.1 North Wolfe Road North of Stevens Creek Required (West) Required (West) N/A See 6.2.201.B.2 Vallco Parkway N/A N/A Required (North) See 6.2.201.B.3 Stevens Creek Boulevard N/A Required N/A See 6.2.201.B.4 Perimeter Road Retrofit (West of North Wolfe) Required Required N/A See 6.2.201.B.5 Perimeter Road Retrofit (East of North Wolfe) N/A N/A Required See 6.2.201.B.6 4.13uilding Height Building Height See A, C, D,E,F SeeA,B,C,FH SeeCD,E,F,G,H Figure6.2.203.A Ground Floor Ceiling Height 11'min. 16'min.' 16'min.' 111'min. along Neighborhood Streets 6-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Standards by Form and Character District 1 6.2.102 Table •Standards Requirements S.Building Placement' Neighborhood/ Mixed Use Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Retail and Entertainment/ Office/ Additional Mixed Use Mixed Use Standards Front/Side Street Setback (Facade Zone) 5'min.;15'max. O'min.;10'max. O'min.;15'max. Side Setback O'min. O'min. O'min. Rear Setback 5'min. 5'min. 5'min. Frontage Build out 2 70%min. 90%min. 80%min. 'Setback measured from back of sidewalk to Building Facade 2The required amount of ground floor facade within the required facade zone setback along the front and along side street 6.Facade Articulation Facade See 6.2.204 See 6.2.204 See 6.2.204 Building Projections' Not Allowed 3'max. 3'max. 'Baywindows and balconies 7.Frontages Porch Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.1 Dooryard Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.2 Stoop Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.3 Forecourt Allowed Allowed' Allowed' See 6.2.205.A.4 Shopfront Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.5 Terrace Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.6 Gallery Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.7 Arcade Allowed Allowed Allowed See 6.2.205.A.8 'Required on any facade that exceeds 200 linear feet as measured along the adjacent sidewalk 8.13arking Placement Figure 6.2.207.0 Front/Side Street Setback 45'min? 45'min? 45'min? Side/Rear Setback 5'min. 5'min. Smin. Vehicular Access Side Street or Alley Side Street or Alley Side Street or Alley 'Parking must be located behind habitable space and not be exposed to view from street or public open space 9.Uses Allowed Uses See 6.2.206.A See 6.2.206.A See 6.2.206.A Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-11 6.2.102 This page intentionally left blank 6-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.2 Town Center Zone Standards 6.2.201 Street and Block Network A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to the design and construction of blocks and streets to generate a street and block network. B. Block Network and Connectivity. The land within the Code boundaries is required to be divided into the minimum network of streets and blocks identified in Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan). Individual block faces and the total block perimeter shall be designed in compliance with the standards identified in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District), and the following: 1. Interconnected Streets. As identified in Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan) streets are required to be interconnected and connect with adjacent thoroughfares to provide multiple routes for pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle trips from, to, and within the site. 2. Pedestrian and Bicycle connectivity is required as identified in Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan). 3. Streets are required to terminate/connect to other streets except as specified in Subsection 6.2.201.B.6.a (Exceptions). Streets are not allowed to terminate on service lanes. Existing streets are to connect with new internal streets and are to be retrofitted as identified in Sections 6.2.201.B.1 -B.6 (Existing Streets). 4. Street Extensions. New streets are required to connect to existing or planned streets and stubs, except when adjacent to existing single family neighborhoods on west side of the Plan Area. 5. Two types of new streets are allowed: Neighborhood and Active Ground Floor types, identified in Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan). Additional streets may be added in compliance with the requirements of this Section. 6. Dead -End Streets and Cul-de-sacs. Streets may not include dead-end streets or cul-de- sacs except as specified below: a. Exceptions. Block face length and perimeter standards are not applicable along: (i) Western edge along Perimeter Road; (ii) Northern edge along Interstate 280; and (iii) North termination of the Neighborhood Street in the North West corner of the Code boundaries. b. The length of a dead-end street is not to exceed 300 feet, as measured from the center of the closest intersection to the center of the cul-de-sac bulb. These streets are to include a suitable turn -around designed subject to the review and approval of the City. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-13 6.2.201 1 Street and Block Network Location and Alignment of Streets. The location of new streets may be adjusted from the location identified in Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan) in compliance with the standards for block size in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District) subject to City review and approval. Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan) shall be revised to reflect the final street locations and alignments as approved by the City, the word "Conceptual" shall be removed from the Figure. C. General Street Standards. All streets are required to be designed in compliance with the standards of the applicable street type, and the General Street Standards provided bellow. 1. All streets and intersections require review of fire and traffic safety and must be approved by the City and appropriate Fire Official. 2. On -street parking standards. a. On -street parking and street trees planters may overlap in section. D. Development Standards. The development standards are to be applied to the land behind the edge of the adjacent street(s). The land in the Code boundaries will be divided into blocks and streets. Each block may remain as part of the larger parcel of which it is a part or, it may be legally subdivided into a new parcel. E. Utilities. The following amenities and utilities shall be installed subject to the specifications of the subdivision ordinance: a. All utilities including water, gas, sanitary and storm sewers, underground power systems; b. Amenities including, lighting electroliers, curbs, gutters, streets and sidewalks; and c. Connections to main systems shall be installed subject to the specifications of the subdivision ordinance of the City. 2. All wires, pipes, cables, utilities and connections shall be placed in underground or subsurface conduits subject to the specifications of the subdivision ordinance of the City. 3. Underground vaults, or, well screened areas, if underground vaults are deemed to be infeasible by the City Engineer and the Director of Community Development, must be provided for the installation of the necessary utilities. 4. Mechanical and other equipment - Air conditioning, exhaust fans, and other mechanical equipment shall be visually screened in a manner satisfactory to the Director of Community Development. 6-14 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Street and Block Network 1 6.2.201 ■ ■ Key Standards ■ Internal Streets Neighborhood See 6.2.201.A.1 -A I Active Ground Floor See 6.2.201.A.2 y+y�A3 r Paseo (Not Required) See 6.2.201.A.3 M Public Streets M Public Streets Active Ground Floor Required Al North Wolfe Road - North of Vallee Parkway See 6.2.201.13.1 A2 North Wolfe Road - No th of Stevens creek See 6.2.201.8.2 A3 Vallco Parkway See 6.2.201.8.3 A4 Stevens Creek Boulevard See 6.2.201.13.4 7Private Streets: Perimeter Road -west of North Wolfe Road See 6.2.201.13.5 A6 Perimeter Road - east of North Wolfe Road See 6.2.201.13.6 Bike Connectivity: Bike Facility Required See 6.2.201.13 Boundaries of Form and Character District See 6.2.101.A ... Town Center Code Boundary NEWi N v �M ITfl2 Q Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-15 6.2.201.A.1 I Neighborhood Street Element A.Overall Width Minimum Maximum Element Minimum Maximum C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street SD' 80' Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along B Lane Assembly sidewalks Through Lanes Curb Type Vertical Number ofTravel Lanes 1each way N/A Cycle Track Allowed/Not Required Gj 7iuffio Lane 10 13' Sidewalk 5' N/A Curb radius 5' N/A D'Facade Articulation On -Street Parking Allowed/Not Required See Section G2204(Facade Articulation) for Requirements Q C. Public Frontage Assembly Planter Type Landscape p|unte/(s)'ur Trees inplanters Planter Width 7' N/A is Tree Spacing Trees ut30'o.o.Avg. 646 Va|kmTown Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2O18 Active Ground Floor Street 16.2.201.A.2 6.2.201.A.2 Active Ground Floor Street See Figure 6.2.203.A , , See Figure 6.2.203.A for Building Height Limits for Building Height Limits A. Overall Width C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street 60' 80' Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along B. Lane Assembly ` sidewalks Through Lanes Curb Type Vertical Number of Travel Lanes 1 each way N/A Cycle Track Allowed/Not Required Traffic Lane 10' 13' Sidewalk 8' N/A Curb radius 5' N/A 1S D. Facade Articulation On -Street Parking Allowed/Not Required See Section6.2.204(FacadeArticulation)forRequirements C. Public Frontage Assembly Planter Type Trees in Tree grates Planter Width 7' N/A is Tree Spacing 30' o.c. Avg. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-17 6.2.201.A.3 I Paseo 6.2.201.A.3 Paseo See Figure 6.2.203.A See Figure 6.2.203.A for Building Height Limits for Building Height Limits (3) A. Overall Width Street 30' N/A 19) B. Public Frontage Assembly Planter Type Landscape planter(s), or Trees in planters Planter Width Varies Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along sidewalks C. Facade Articulation See Section 6.2.204 (Facade Articulation) for Requirements 9 6-18 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.2O1.A.4 Service Lane See Figure 6.2.203.A Service Lane 16.2.201.A.4 See Figure 6.2.203.A A. Overall Width Street B. Lane Assembly 30' N/A Through Lanes Number of Travel Lanes 1 each way N/A Traffic Lane 10' 13' Curb radius 5' C. Public Frontage Assembly Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along sidewalks Curb Type Vertical Sidewalk 5' N/A Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-19 6.2.201.6.1 1 North Wolfe Road - North of Vallco Parkway 6.2.201.6.1 North Wolfe Road - North of Vallco Parkway See Figure 6.2.203.A See Figure 6.2.203.A for Building Height Limits for Building Height Limits C3 C2 [1 63 [1 Table 6.2.201.6.1: Street Standards Element Minimum Maximum OverallA. B1 (9--m- 13 3 C C1 C3 1 Table 6.2.201.6.1: Street Standards (Conti Element Minimum Maximur PublicC. • •Assembly Street 240' N/A Planter Type Varies B. Lane Assembly Planter Width Varies QD Through Lanes Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. The number and length of required through lanes, turn lanes Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along and median shall be specified by the City, in order to provide sidewalks for the transportation mitigation measures specified in this Curb Type Vertical Specific Plan's Environmental Impact Report. Cycle Track Curb radius 25' one-way 6'-6" N/A Frontage Road Sidewalk 15' 20' Number of Travel Lanes 1 each way N/A D. Facade Articulation Travel Lane 10' 12' See Section 6.2.204 (Facade Articulation) for Requirements Q On -Street Parking Lane 8' 8'' 6-20 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 North Wolfe Road -North of Stevens Creek Boulevard 1 6.2.201.13.2 6.2.201.B.2 North Wolfe Road -North of Stevens Creek Boulevard See Figure 6.2.203.A for Building Height Limits y m -mm m y(3 + Existing East side of Street to Remain Table 6.2.201.113.2: Street Standards Table 6.2.201.B.2: Street Standards (Continued) Element minimum maximum Element Minimum Maximum A. Overall Width C. Public Frontage Assembly Street 175' N/A m Planter Type Varies B. Lane Assembly Planter Width Varies Through Lanes Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. The number and length of required through lanes, turn lanes Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along and median shall be specified by the City, in order to provide sidewalks for the transportation mitigation measures specified in this Curb Type Vertical Specific Plan's Environmental Impact Report. Cycle Track (� Curb radius 25' one-way 6'-6" N/A Frontage Road Sidewalk 15' 20' (a Number of Travel Lanes 1 N/A D. Facade Articulation Travel Lane 10' 12' m See Section 6.2.204 (Facade Articulation) for Requirements G On -Street Parking Lane 8' 8' m Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-21 6.2.201.6.3 1 Vallco Parkway 6.2.201.13.3 Vallco Parkway See Figure 6.2.203.A Existing South side of Street to Remain 6-22 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 I_ A. Overall Width C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street 120' N/A Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. B. Lane Assembly Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along Through Lanes sidewalks The number and length of required through lanes, turn lanes Curb Type Vertical and median shall be specified by the City, in order to provide Cycle Track (� for the transportation mitigation measures specified in this one-way 6'-6" N/A Specific Plan's Environmental Impact Report. Sidewalk 14' N/A .e On -Street Parking Lane 8' 8' D. Facade Articulation Curb radius 25' m See Section 6.2.204 (Facade Articulation) for Requirements C. Public Frontage Assembly Planter Type Varies Planter Width Varies 6-22 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Stevens Creek Boulevard 16.2.201.B.4 6.2.201.B.4 Stevens Creek Boulevard See Figure 6.2.203.A i i for Building Height Limits Existing South side of Street to Remain Table • .. • .. . Element Minimum Maximum A. Overall Width Element Minimum Maximum C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street 164' N/A Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. B. Lane Assembly Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along Through Lanes sidewalks The number and length of required through lanes, turn lanes Curb Type Vertical and median shall be specified by the City, in order to provide Cycle Track (� for the transportation mitigation measures specified in this one-way 6'-6" N/A Specific Plan's Environmental Impact Report. Sidewalk 14' N/A .e Curb radius 25' D. Facade Articulation On -Street Parking Not Allowed See Section6.2.204(FacadeArticulation)forRequirements Q C. Public Frontage Assembly Planter Type Varies Planter Width Varies Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-23 6.2.201.6.5 I Perimeter Road - West of North Wolfe Road 6.2.201.13.5 Perimeter Road - West of North Wolfe Road See Figure 6.2.203.A I fnr Ruildinn Hainht I imits Existing East side of Street to Remain A. Overall Width C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street 60' N/A Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along B. Lane Assembly sidewalks Through Lanes Curb Type Vertical Number of Travel Lanes 1 each way N/A Cycle Track (� Traffic Lane 10' 13' Two-way 12' N/A Curb radius 5' G Sidewalk 5' N/A On -Street Parking Allowed/Not Required D. Facade Articulation C. Public Frontage Assembly See Section6.2.204(FacadeArticulation)forRequirements Planter Type Varies E. Notes Planter Width Varies Street may moved to accommodate green way or other Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. Open Space type. 6-24 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Perimeter Road - East of North Wolfe Road 16.2.201.B.6 6.2.201.13.6 Perimeter Road - East of North Wolfe Road See Figure 6.2.203.A , for Building Height Limits ,q J . IIII Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-25 � - Existing West side of Street to Remain Table • Standards . •Standards Element Minimum maximum Element Minimum Maximum A. Overall Width C. Public Frontage Assembly (continued) Street 60' N/A Lighting Type Pedestrian scaled along B. Lane Assembly j sidewalks Through Lanes Curb Type Vertical Number of Travel Lanes 1 each way N/A Cycle Track Traffic Lane 10' 13' one-way 6'-6" N/A Curb radius 5' Sidewalk 8' N/A On -Street Parking Allowed/Not Required D. Facade Articulation C. Public Frontage Assembly See Section6.2.204(FacadeArticulation)forRequirements Planter Type Varies Planter Width Varies Tree Spacing Trees at 30' o.c. Avg. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-25 6.2.201.6.5 This page intentionally left blank 6-26 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Open Space 1 6.2.202 6.2.202 Open Space A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to all development and improvements within the Code boundaries as identified in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District). B. Publicly Accessible Open Space. 1. Required Amount. a. Six (6) acres of publicly accessible open space are required within the Code Boundaries. Planting strips and parkways in streets do not qualify as publicly accessible open space. b. The required amount for each form and character district maybe distributed within each district using the allowed open space types. 2. Location. a. Publicly accessible open space shall be located in the general location(s) identified in Figure 6.2.202.A (Conceptual Open Space Regulating Plan) using the allowed open space types and requirements in Table 6.2.202.B (Open Space Requirements). Upon final approval of open space locations and types, Figure 6.2.202.A (Conceptual Open Space Regulating Plan) shall be revised to reflect the final location, sizes and types. The word "Conceptual shall be removed from the Figure. Open Space Type Min. Width Min. Size Other Requirements Parkland Requirement I Per CMC Table 13.08.050 - Parkland Dedication Table Min. total at grade publicly N/A 6.0 Acres Generally at level of adjacent sidewalk accessible open space (+/-12 inches) Remaining on site open space Shall be consistent with open space Publicly accessible open space shall (may be above ground) types listed below be credited 100% towards parkland requirement. Open spaces that are privately accessible to residents shall be credited 50% towards parkland requirement. Private open space provided for office users only do not count since office use is not subject to a parkland requirement Park Fees N/A N/A Any parkland requirement that is not met on site shall pay the applicable parkland fee per CMC Chapter 13.08 (Parkland Dedication Fee) Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-27 6.2.202 1 Open Space Open Space Type Min. Width (feet) Min. Size Other Requirements Open Space Types to count towards Parkland Requirement (whether publicly or privately accessible) Greenway 55 feet 1.0 acre See 6.2.202.A.1 Neighborhood Park 90 feet 0.25 acre See 6.2.202.A.2 Plaza/Square: Town Square 200 feet 1.75 acres See 6.2.202.A.3 (Retail and Entertainment/Mixed Use District) Plaza/Square: East Plaza 125 feet 0.75 See 6.2.202.A.3 (Office/Mixed Use District) Pedestrian Bridge If landscaped open space is provided on See 6.2.202.A.4 the bridge, shall be consistent with open space types listed above Pocket Plaza/Park 50 feet 2,500 sq. ft. See 6.2.202.A.5 Private Open Space Common Open Space for 60 feet 60 sq. ft. Privately accessible. May be provided in Residential Units the form of podium central courtyards, pool areas, decks, etc. C. Trees. Existing trees identified in Figure 6.2.202.A (Conceptual Open Space Regulating Plan); and described below will be integrated to the extend feasible into street retrofit and landscaping improvements at the following locations: 1. Perimeter Road. Trees along the western edge of Perimeter Road, identified as m; 2. North Wolfe Road between 1-280 and Vallco Parkway. Trees on both sides of the street and within the median, identified as lb; 3. North Wolfe Road between Vallco Parkway and Stevens Creek Boulevard. Trees on the western edge of North Wolfe Road and within the median, identified as (a); and 4. Stevens Creek Boulevard. Trees along the northern edge of Stevens Creek Boulevard, identified as (D. 5. Existing trees shall be evaluated by a certified arborist to determine the condition of trees and which are to be preserved or replaced. 6-28 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 I I 1 - 1 - Merest Dr 1 v w 0 Z( - r 7 � -C r 1 J O Z I r T2 T2 a � r r r `____' r r r _ • r i i t . r t i -V�11c� PkV* . r r r .a. E. T I • • - 1 ra 1 ................... !. 1 = m mSTt\MnSCQ2elt ffver - - �. Open Space 1 6.2.202 Key Standards W General Location of Open Space: Q 0 Retail and Entertainment/Mixed Use District See 6.2.102.2.A Q Neighborhood/Mixed Use District See 6.2.102.2.A ® Office/Mixed Use District See 6.2.102.2.A Active Ground Floor Required around Town Square and East Plaza 0 Trees: See 6.2.202.2.0 Q Perimeter Road - western Edge Q N. Wolfe Road - Between I-280 and vallco T❑s N. Wolfe Road - Between Vallee and Stevens Creek Q Stevens Creek Boulevard - Northern Edge 1 Min Network of Internal Streets See 6.2.201 for reference M Existing Streets (Private and Public) See 6.2.201 for reference Boundaries of Form and Character District ... Town Center Code Boundary Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-29 6.2.202.A.1 I Greenway 6.2.202.A.1 Greenway General Note: Images on this page are illustrative, not regulatory. Linear space for community gathering and strolling for residents and employees, serving multiple neighborhoods. Greenways can serve an important role as a green connector between destinations. Formal or informal Hardscape path(s) within at least 60% landscaping Spatially defined by tree -lined streets and adjacent buildings C. Size . Location Min.1 acre Min. Width 55 ft. D. Typical Uses Passive recreation Formal or informal seating Multi -use pathway at the Western Edge if combined 6-30 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Neighborhood Park 16.2.202.A.2 6.2.202.A.2 Neighborhood Park 'CII�IIII� General Note: Images on this page are illustrative, not regulatory. Neighborhood focal point available for civic purposes, commercial activity, and passive uses. Appropriate civic elements, kiosk, and pergola. Formal, urban Combination of hardscape (60%min.) and planted areas (40%max.) in formal patterns Spatially defined by tree -lined streets and adjacent buildings Walkways and plantings at all edges, shaded seating areas Civic element must be provided C. Size and Location Min. 0.25 acre Min. Width 90 ft. D. Typical Uses Unstructured or structured recreation Commercial and civic uses Casual seating and/or outdoor dining Multi -use pathway at the Western Edge if combined Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-31 6.2.202.A.3 I Plaza/Square 6.2.202.A.3 Plaza/Square 9=RF MW i A. Description Community -wide focal point primarily for civic purposes and commercial activities, serving multiple neighborhoods. Commercial activities are subordinate to Civic activity. Formal, urban Combination of hardscaped (60%min.) and (40%max.) in planted areas in formal patterns Spatially defined by buildings and tree -lined streets Civic element provided 0. Size anC1 Location Town Square Min. 1.75 acre Min. Width 200 ft. Required in Retail and Entertainment/Mixed Use District East Plaza Min. 0.75 acre Min. Width 125 ft. Required in Office/Mixed Use District General Note: Images on this page are illustrative, not Civic uses, commercial uses in support of civic uses regulatory. Passive recreation 6-32 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.202.A.4 Pedestrian Bridge j�. General Note: Images on this page are illustrative, not regulatory. Pedestrian Bridge 16.2.202.A.4 Abr Community -wide focal point primarily for commercial activities while functioning as a publicly accessible open space. Formal or informal, urban Combination of planted areas (60%min.) and hardscape Min. Width 30 ft. Only allowed across North Wolfe Road Passive recreation, casual seating Commercial uses open to the public See Table 6.2.206.A (Allowed Land Uses) Food or retail kiosks not more than 500 sq. ft. each and not more than 2,500 sq. ft. total and less than 5% open space sq. ft. Other buildings allowed per the land use table shall not count towards open space Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-33 6.2.202.A.5 I Pocket Plaza/Park 6.2.202.A.5 Pocket Plaza/Park General Note: Images on this page are illustrative, not regulatory. Small-scale, open space available for civic purposes and commercial activity serving the immediate neighborhood, intended as intimate spaces for seating or dining. Pocket plazas can also be used to create a formal space in front of a prominent building entrance. Formal, urban Primarily hardscape (60%min.) with landscape accents Spatially defined by building frontages and upper story facades Trees and shrubs optional C. Size . Location Min. 2,500 sq. ft. Min. Width 50 ft. D. Typical Uses Civic activity Commercial in support of civic activity Casual seating and/or outdoor dining 6-34 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.202.A.5 This page intentionally left blank Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-35 6.2.203 1 Building Height 6.2.203 Building Height A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to new buildings and their additions. B. Height Areas. Eight height areas implement the intended physical character described in the Specific Plan. The allowed height areas are identified in Figure 6.2.203.A (Building Height Regulating Plan). C. Maximum Height. Each height area has a maximum base height that is by -right (Tier 1). Additional height is allowed when public benefits are provided (Tier 2) as described in Chapter 7 (Administration, Implementation and Financing) in the Specific Plan; and identified in Table 6.2.203.A (Height Limits) below. Area Max. Height Tier 1 Max. Height Tier 2 Area A 45'max. 45'max. Area B 60'max. 60'max. Area C 60'max. (72'max. on Area H) 75'max. (87'max. on Area H) Area D 75'max. 75'max. Area E 75'max. 95'max. Area F 85'max. (97'max. on Area H) 120'max. (132'max. on Area H) Area G 120'max. 150'max. D. Height adjacent to Open Space. Building height shall be adjusted in compliance with the height to width ratio requirements in Figure 6.2.203.13 (Height to width adjacent to Open Space) within the maximum allowed by this Section for the required Town Square and East Plaza. Distance between buildings (may include roads) is required to equal or exceed Figure 6.2.203.8 Height -to -width adjacent to Open Space 6-36 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 II \ Building Height 1 6.2.203 :AS 75' B Ai i P'J-S%\Cn4C1rbeT ff/cr M A4, _ Q1 -T Key Standards Building Height Area: 0 A See 6.2.203 0 B See 6.2.203 C See 6.2.203 D See 6.2.203 E See 6.2.203 F See 6.2.203 G See 6.2.203 i _; H See 6.2.203 No Build Zone: 56 feet No Build Zone measured from single family property line r Height boundaries along 45 degree angle Min Network of Internal Streets See 6.2.201 for reference Public Streets See 6.2.201 for reference All Areas measured from Plan Area property line, unless noted otherwise Boundaries of Form and Character District ... Town Center Code Boundary Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-37 6.2.204 1 Facade Articulation 6.2.204 Facade Articulation A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to new buildings, additions or facade renovations that are within fifty feet of a street or public open space. B. Requirements. At least one of the fagade articulation techniques in Subsection B.2 and B.3 identified in Table 6.2.204.A (Facade Articulation), as relevant is to be applied to the building design. The design of the building is subject to review and approval by the City. 1. All buildings Tripartite Fagade Design. Facades shall be designed with tripartite architecture, with a distinct base, middle and top. An expression line, setback or other architectural element shall be used to delineate the base and top. 2. Above the third story on all buildings ■ ■ Change in Color, Material. This technique modulates the apparent size and scale of a building by changing colors and/or materials and may be applied •� throughout the building but is required above the third story. R-P 3. Buildings over 150 feet long Architectural Recession(s). This technique modulates the apparent size and scale of a building by recessing a portion(s) of the fagade as an architectural element(s) or space(s) from the plane(s): a recessed entry from the sidewalk, a loggia or recessed balcony cut into the plane of the facade. Buildings that exceed 250 linear feet as measured along the adjacent sidewalk are required to integrate a Forecourt in compliance with Section 6.2.205.A.4 (Forecourt). The recession at the ground floor is required to extend through the top of the building. * �iiiilm Horizontal Articulation. This technique modulates the apparent size and scale of the building by stepping a portion of the facade forward or backward from the predominant fagade plane by at least three feet forward or backward. This technique may be applied throughout the building but is required above the third story. Vertical Articulation. This technique modulates the apparent size and scale of the building by stepping a portion of the facade upward or downward from the predominant building height. This technique offers the opportunity to organize a long building into multiple apparent buildings to avoid the appearance of a block -long building. When this technique is applied, a minimum vertical distance of one story upward or downward is required. 6-38 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Frontages 1 6.2.205 6.2.205 Frontages A. Applicability. These requirements on this Section apply to all ground floor facades along a street, paseo or publicly accessible open space. Table 6.2.205.A (Frontage Types Overview) provides an overview of the allowed frontage types. Other frontage types such as those for office buildings and large residential buildings may be allowed subject to design review. B. Requirements for active ground floor frontage. 1. Each building shall apply at least one frontage type on each facade along a street or open space, using the frontage types allowed in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District). 2. A building may have multiple frontage types in compliance with the requirements of this Section. 3. Fencing or other physical barriers between facades and the sidewalk along a street or public open space must be in compliance with the standards of this section. 4. Fencing is not allowed to be used to prevent public access to building entries and public open spaces. 5. The required setbacks identified in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District) identify the required distance between each building facade and the sidewalk along the adjacent open space or street. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-39 6.2.205.A.1 I Porch 6.2.205.A.1 Porch Setback Sidewalk Street Key -••- Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line A. Description I I The main facade of the building is setback from the adjacent sidewalk to accommodate the porch. The porch may be entirely or partially recessed into the facade. The resulting front yard is typically very small and can be defined by a fence or hedge to spatially maintain the edge of the street. Width, Clear 8'min. Setback/BTL Sidewalk Street Depth, Clear 6'min. Height, Clear 8'min. Finish Level above Sidewalk 18"min. O Example of projecting porch that extends the living area into the front yard. Area between Porch and Sidewalk 3'min. © Height of fence or hedge 2'-6"max. Building is allowed over Porch N/A C. Miscellaneous Porches must be open on at least two sides Porches must have a roof, 6-40 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Dooryard 16.2.205.A.2 6.2.205.A.2 Dooryard Setback Sidewalk Street Key - -- Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line A. Description The main facade of the building is set back from the adjacent sidewalk and the resulting space is defined by a low wall or hedge, creating a small yard. The dooryard does not provide public circulation along a street. The dooryard is typically at grade and is intended for ground - floor residential and/or live/work. Depth, Clear 5'min. 0 Ground Floor Transparency 50%min.' Depth of Recessed Entries 5'max. Finish Level above Sidewalk 3-6"max. O A series of dooryards with low fences defining the private Finish Level below Sidewalk 6'max edge, and engaging the sidewalk. Setback Sidewalk Street Height of fence or hedge 2'-6"max. For live/work, retail and service uses only C. Miscellaneous For live/work, retail and service uses, these standards are to be used in conjunction with those for the Shopfront Type. In case of conflict design review shall be utilized to resolve the standard. Each Dooryard may provide access up to five ground floor entries. A series of small commercial dooryards. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-41 6.2.205.A.3 I Stoop 6.2.205.A.3 Stoop Setback Sidewalk Street Key -­ Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line The main facade of the building is near the adjacent sidewalk and an elevated stoop engages the sidewalk to provide privacy for the sidewalk -facing rooms. Stairs or ramps from the stoop may lead directly to the sidewalk or may be side -accessed. The stoop may be entirely or partially recessed into the facade. The stoop is appropriate for residential uses with small setbacks. Width, Clear 4'min.; 8'max. 0 Setback Sidewalk Street Depth, Clear 4'min. Height 1 story max. High stoop clears space for windows along basement. Depth of Recessed Entries 6'max. Finish Level above Sidewalk 18"min. 0 Height of fence 3'max. r MiscellaneousC. Stairs may be perpendicular or parallel to the building facade. Ramps shall be parallel to facade or along the side of the building. Entry doors are covered or recessed to provide shelter from the elements. Gates are not allowed. Doors are required to be visible from the street Uniquely shaped stoop. 6-42 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.205.A.4 Forecourt Setback Sidewalk Street Key - •- Sidewalk/ Lot Line ..... Setback Line The main facade of the building is at or near the adjacent sidewalk and a small portion is set back, creating a small court space. The space may be used as an entry court or shared garden space for apartment buildings, office, or as an additional shopping or restaurant seating area within retail and service areas. Width, Clear 30'min. Q Depth, Clear 30'min. a Height above sidewalk 3-6"max. Height of fence or hedge 2'-6"max Public Review Draft - August 2018 n Forecourt 16.2.205.A.4 Setback Sidewalk Street O This forecourt visually extends the public realm into the lot. I -- Will 'Aift i_ - This residential forecourt provides an entry yard and breaks down the overall massing along the street. Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-43 6.2.205.A.5 I Shopfront 6.2.205.A.5 Shopfront Setback Sidewalk Street Key - -- Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line A. Description The main facade of the building is at or near the adjacent sidewalk with at -grade entrance(s) along the sidewalk. This type is intended for retail and/or office use, has substantial glazing between the shopfront base and the ground floor ceiling, and may include an awning that overlaps the sidewalk. Terrace, gallery, and arcade frontages are used in conjunction with shopfront. Distance between Glazing 1'max. 0 Ground Floor Transparency 75%min. Distance between entries 50'max. Depth of Recessed Entries Umax. Entry flush with sidewalk Awning/CanopyC. Depth 4'min. 0 Setback from Curb 2'min. Di Height, Clear 8'min. D. Miscellaneous Residential windows are not allowed. Reflective or dark glass is not allowed. Operable awnings and open-ended awnings are allowed. dol _1 Setback Sidewalk Street 2 story shopfront Shopfront with pilastered bays and recessed entry. 6-44 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.205.A.6 Terrace Setback Sidewalk Street Key - -- Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line The main facade of the building is setback from the adjacent sidewalk to provide space for an elevated terrace providing public circulation along the facade. This type can be used to provide at -grade access while accommodating a grade change. Frequent steps up to the terrace are necessary to avoid dead walls and maximize access. Depth, Clear 8'min. a Finish Level above Sidewalk 4'max. a Height of fence or hedge 2'-6"max. Terrace 16.2.205.A.6 Setback Sidewalk Street Cy Terrace is used to accommodate a change in grade with low walls to provide seating. These standards are to be used in conjunction with those for the Shopfront Type where the Shopfront Type is required. Low walls used as seating are allowed. One terrace spans across four residential units with individual entries separated by landscaping. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-45 6.2.205.A.7 I Gallery 6.2.205.A.7 Gallery Setback Sidewalk Street Key -..-Sidewalk/ Lot Line -•••• Setback Line The main fapade of the building is at or near the adjacent sidewalk and the gallery element overlaps the sidewalk. This type is intended for buildings with ground -floor commercial, retail, office uses and may be one or two stories. Depth, Clear 8'min. Q Ground Floor Height, Clear 11'min. 0 Upper Floor Height, Clear 9'min. 0 Height 2 stories max. Setback from Curb 2'min.; 3'max. © A two-story gallery with the second story covered. C. Miscellaneous Galleries shall project over the sidewalk. Galleries along an attached plaza, pocket plaza, or pocket park may be set back further from curb. Setback Sidewalk Street Fencing not allowed. A two-story gallery over the sidewalk. 6-46 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.205.A.8 Arcade Setback Sidewalk Street Key - -- Sidewalk/ Lot Line ----- Setback Line The main facade of the building is at or near the adjacent sidewalk and the arcade overlaps the sidewalk. The arcade extends far enough from the building to provide adequate protection and circulation for pedestrians. This type is intended for buildings with ground floor commercial, retail, office uses and is common along public courtyards and paseos. Depth, clear 8'min. Q Ground floor height, clear 11'min. clear a Setback from edge of curb 2'min.; 3'max. The arcades provide the only means of circulation along C. Miscellaneous the ROW. The arcade shall incorporate the regulations for the Shopfront Type. Arcades shall have a consistent depth. 0 1 Arcades along an attached plaza, pocket plaza, or pocket �f park may be set back further from curb.NOR ,y: Arcade 16.2.205.A.8 Setback Sidewalk Street Fencing not allowed. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-47 6.2.206 1 Uses 6.2.206 Uses A. Applicability 1. The requirements of this Section apply to new uses, change in use, and expansion in use. 2. Land Uses are described and defined in Chapter 19.08 (Definitions). Where CUP is required, findings consistent with applicable section of Chapter 19.08 (Definitions). 3. Specialized terms and phrases are described in Section 6.3 (Definitions) of this Chapter. B. Allowed Uses. 1. Table 6.2.206.A (Allowed Land Uses) identifies the allowed uses in each form and character district and the required permit. 2. Figure 6.2.201.A (Conceptual Street and Block Network Regulating Plan) identifies certain streets as Active Ground Floor streets. The allowed uses are coordinated with this diagram to implement the Specific Plan's intent to create a pedestrian -oriented environment of primarily retail, restaurants, personal services, and entertainment with ground floor lodging and/or residential lobbies. C. Minimum Retail Requirement. Only the following uses shall qualify for this minimum. 1. Retail; 2. Restaurant and Bars; 3. Entertainment; 4. Health and Fitness facilities (10%max. of total retail. Maybe increased to 15%max. to accommodate large format fitness center); 5. Personal Service (10%max. of total retail); and 6. Assembly uses (5%max. of total retail). Use Type Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Retail and Neighborhood/ Entertainment/ Office/Mixed Mixed Use Use Mixed Use A. Residential Multi Family P P P Home Occupation P P P Small family day care (within residential units) P P P Large family day care (within residential units) N/A N/A N/A Live/Work P P P Congregate Residence (Co -Housing) P P P Key P Permitted CUP -A Conditional Use Administrative N/A Not Allowed 6-48 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Uses 1 6.2.206 Use Type Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Retail and Neighborhood/ Entertainment/ Office/Mixed Mixed Use Use Mixed Use B. Retail Regional Retail* Pedestrian Oriented Retail P P P P P P Specialty Food P P P Convenience Market P P P Arts/music/photography studio P P P Temporary /seasonal events (Farmers Market) P'/ CUP -A P P Co -working i/incubator P 2 P 2 P 2 'Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square 2Up to 40,000 sq. ft. of retail is allowed. Exceeding 40,000 sq. ft. is counted toward office use. C. Restaurants and Bars Eating Establishments, with the following features: Without bar facilities; With bar facilities; Outdoor Dining P P P P P P P P P Bars/Clubs/Lounges P'/ CUP -A P P Live entertainment in association with eating establishments P'/ CUP -A P P ' Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square D. Entertainment Theaters P'/ CUP -A P P Family Entertainment (Bowling, Skating, etc.) P'/ CUP -A P P ' Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square E. Civic/Cultural Performing Arts Center P'/ CUP -A P P Public Educational Facility P P P Public Safety: Up to 1,000 sq. ft. Over 1,000 sq. ft. P CUP -A P CUP -A P P ' Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square Key P Permitted CUP -A Conditional Use Administrative N/A Not Allowed Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-49 6.2.206 1 Uses Table 6.2.206.A: Allowed Land Uses (continued) Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Retail and Use Type Neighborhood/ Entertainment/ Office/Mixed Mixed Use Use Mixed Use F. Assembly (No more than 5% of total Retail) Churches, private clubs, lodges, or fraternal organizations CUP-A (As subordinate uses in buildings intended primarily for other permitted uses provided for in this Section). P' P' Churches, private clubs, lodges, or fraternal organizations CUP -A 2 (As principal uses in buildings). CUP -A 2 CUP -A 2 'With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor where active ground floor uses are required 2 Not Allowed in areas requiring active ground floor uses G. Hospitality Hotel P'/ CUP -A P P 'Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square H. Health and Fitness (10% max. of Retail; 15% max. for large format/single user) Fitness Centers, Gyms P P P Indoor Sports P' P' P' 'With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor where active ground floor uses are required I. Personal Services - Directly serve the Public (10% max. of Retail) Beauty salon/barber shop P P P Spas/Massage establishments P P P Real State/Insurance Offices/Financial Offices/Banks P P P Dry cleaner/Tailor P P P Business services (FedEx, etc.) P P P Specialized schools, Dance/music studios P P P Daycare P' P' P' Dog day care (Located in sound -proof structures) P P P Auto services N/A N/A N/A 'With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor where active ground floor uses are required J. Office/Research and Development Service offices (medical/dental), limited to 250,000 sq.ft. P' of total office use P 2 P Corporate/R&D/incubator, coworking space P P 2 P Office amenity space P P 2 P 'With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor along Town Square 2 With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor where active ground floor uses are required Key P Permitted CUP -A Conditional Use Administrative N/A Not Allowed 6-50 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Uses 1 6.2.206 Town Center Zone Form and Character Districts Key P Permitted CUP -A Conditional Use Administrative N/A Not Allowed Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-51 Retail and Use Type Neighborhood/ Office/Mixed Entertainment/ Mixed Use Use _ ■ Mixed Use K. Other Accessory facilities and uses customarily incidental to P P P permitted uses and otherwise conforming with provisions of CMC Chapter 19.100 Bike hub/Mobility hub P P P Commercial garages P P P Establishments with drive-through facilities N/A N/A N/A Late evening activities which occur between 11:00 pm P'/ CUP -A P P through 7:00 am Live entertainment (outdoor) P'/ CUP -A P P Public Storage N/A N/A N/A Warehouse business consistent with the character of CUP -A2 CUP -A2 CUP -A 2 the Town Center Specific Plan, and which do not create significant adverse impacts to the surrounding area due to odor, dust, fumes, glare, radiation, vibration, noise, traffic or litter Wireless communication facilities See CMC Title 19 See CMC Title 19 See CMC Title 19 Other uses which are neither permitted uses or nor CUP -A CUP -A CUP -A excluded uses and which are, consistent with the character of the Town Center Specific Plan, and which do not create significant adverse impacts to the surrounding area due to odor, dust, fumes, glare, radiation, vibration, noise, traffic or litter ' Permitted when facing North Wolfe Road and Town Square 2With no more than 50 ft. of frontage on ground floor where active ground floor uses are required L. Pedestrian Bridge over North Wolfe Road Restaurants P P P Retail/food kiosks under 500 sq. ft. each (no more than P P P 2,500 sq. ft. total) within open spaces Key P Permitted CUP -A Conditional Use Administrative N/A Not Allowed Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-51 6.2.207 1 Parking 6.2.207 Parking A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to all development and improvements within the Town Center Code Boundaries, unless otherwise specified, as described below: 1. New building; 2. Change in use; and 3. Changes in intensity of buildings or structures made after the effective date of this ordinance that cause an increase or decrease of 25 percent or greater in: a. Gross floor area; b. Seating capacity; c. Dwelling units; and/or d. Parking spaces. B. Parking and Vehicle Access. 1. Allowed Spaces. a. The minimum and maximum number of parking spaces allowed is listed in Table 6.2.207.A (Parking Spaces Requirements), and the permitted land uses in Section 6.2.206 (Uses). See Chapter 19.124 (Parking Regulations) in Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) for additional standards. b. Sharing of parking between different uses and developments is permitted, requires parking study. Table • . Spaces Auto Bike Use Type Minimum Maximum Minimum Residential 0.5/bedroom Studios 1.5/unit see CMC 1 Bed 1.5/unit 2+ bed 2/unit Office see CMCsee CMC; except 250,000 of see CMC office amenity space shall not provide any parking Retail see CMC' see CMC see CMC Entertainment see CMC' see CMC see CMC Theaters/PAC see CMC' see CMC see CMC Other see CMC' see CMC see CMC Hotel see CMC' see CMC see CMC ' Parking study subject to Max. requiremets. 6-52 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Parking 1 6.2.207 2. Traffic -Minimizing Parking Standards. a. Carshare Parking Spaces. If parking is provided at a development, carshare parking spaces shall be provided in the amounts specified in Table 6.2.207.13(Required Carshare Parking Spaces) below. Land Use Required Spaces Residential 0 - 49 units None 50 -200 units 1 201 or more units 2 + 1 per additional 200 units Office <_ 10,000 sf None > 10,000 sf 1/100,000 sf b. The required carshare spaces shall be made available, to a carshare service for purposes of providing carshare services to its members. At the election of the property owner, the carshare spaces may be provided: (1) On the building site; and (2) On another off-street site that is both within 800 feet of the building site and within the Plan Area. c. Required carshare space or spaces shall be designed in a manner that will make the spaces accessible to non-resident subscribers from outside the building as well as building residents. d. If it is demonstrated to the satisfaction of the City that no carshare service can make use of the dedicated carshare parking spaces, the spaces may be occupied by non-carshare vehicles. 3. Carpool Spaces. If parking is provided at a development, parking spaces reserved for use by carpool/vanpool vehicles shall be designated in preferred locations (e.g. closest to building entries). C. Parking Spaces, Lot Design and Layout. 1. Parking Access Points. Access to parking spaces should follow these standards: a. Side street: Limited to one per block face; b. Rear of building, from alley: Up to 2 c. Access driveway width. (i) Side Street: up to 20 feet. (ii) Rear of building, from alley: up to 30 feet Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-53 6.2.207 1 Parking 2. Accessible Parking. All parking facilities that require accessible parking spaces shall ensure that a portion of the total number of required parking spaces shall be specifically designated, located, and reserved for use by persons with physical disabilities, in accordance with the standards in the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 3. Dimensional Standards for Parking Spaces and Aisles. a. Parking facilities shall comply with City of Cupertino standards. See Table 19.124.040(A) (Parking Space Dimensions) and Table 19.124(B) (Uni-size Stall Dimensions) in Chapter 19.124 (Parking Regulations). 4. Parking Area Location. Parking is allowed to be located as described below: a. At -grade and above grade. Parking spaces shall be located in compliance with the parking setbacks identified in Table 6.2.102.A (Standards by Form and Character District). b. Below -grade. Parking spaces may be located anywhere on the site in compliance with all other applicable requirements. D. General Parking Standards. 1. On-site Parking. On-site parking for retail uses shall be provided as available -to -the -public parking, not reserved to a specific business or property. 2. Allowed parking may be provided off-site at another location within the Code Boundaries. Building Parking Area Parking must be setback as identified in Table 6.2.102.A Figure 6.2.207.A Parking Area Location 6-54 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Parking 1 6.2.207 3. Larger Vehicle Parking a. Trucks, tractors or tractor -trailers having a capacity of more than a one -and -one -half - ton load, front- and rear -end loaders, or any kind of commercial, industrial, agricultural or transportation vehicles/equipment used primarily for business purposes, shall not be parked or stored in the Code Boundaries for purposes other than unloading, loading or delivery services. b. Automobiles, small trucks, vans, vehicle trailers allowed in conjunction with an approved home occupation (one per home occupation), and recreational vehicles, utilized for personal or business use, are excluded from the provisions of this Section. c. Recreational vehicles shall not be parked in the front yard setback unless adequately screened as determined by the City. 4. Cargo or Freight Container. Portable cargo or freight storage containers in the Plan Area for purposes of loading or unloading, may be parked or stored for a period not to exceed 10 days and shall be located in the rear of the building site. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-55 6.2.208 1 Screening 6.2.208 Screening A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to all development and improvements within the Code Boundaries. B. Design Standards for Screening. 1. High quality screening, compatible with arch and surorrundings, is required. Subject to design review as part of the ASA. C. Reduction of Required Screening or Screening Design Standards. 1. The City may completely or partially waive required screening and associated standards in cases where the City deems the relief necessary to maintain or enhance the architectural character of the surrounding neighborhood. D. Fencing on retaining walls. The total height of fences and the retaining walls that they are mounted on or attached to shall be limited in height to six feet subject to city review and approval. However, the City may approve higher fencing if it is determined that there will be little or no impact on the adjoining properties and the height is necessary to achieve the objectives of this Section or is required for health and safety. E. Mechanical Equipment Screening. For all new installation or relocation of existing mechanical equipment for commercial/ industrial development, the equipment shall be screened from public view whether installed on the roof, ground, or walls. a. Roof -mounted equipment. Building parapets or other architectural elements in the building's architecture style shall screen roof -mounted equipment. (1) New buildings shall be designed to provide a parapet or other architectural element that is as tall or taller than the highest point on any new mechanical equipment to be located on the roof of the building. (2) For existing buildings with no or low parapet heights, mechanical equipment shall be surrounded on all sides by an opaque screen wall as tall as the highest point of the equipment. The wall shall be architecturally consistent with the building. All new roof screens are subject to City review and approval. 6-56 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Screening 1 6.2.208 b. Wall- and ground -mounted equipment (1) High quality screening, compatible with arch and surorrundings, is required. s subject to design review as part of the ASA. (2) Shall not be located between the face of the building and the street. (3) All screen devices shall be as high as the highest point of the equipment being screened. Equipment and screening shall meet rear and side yard setbacks of the applicable form and character district. (4) Screening shall be architecturally compatible with the building. (5) All new mechanical screens for ground or wall -mounted equipment shall be subject to City review and approval. F. Trash Enclosure Screening. 1. All outdoor storage areas for refuse containers and all loading/unloading areas or service bays shall be designed in compliance with Chapter 19.48 (Fences). Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-57 6.2.209 1 Bird -safe Design 6.2.209 Bird -safe Design A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to new buildings and their additions. B. Bird -safe Design. 1. Future development shall incorporate bird safe building design measures such as the following standards and as determined by best professional practice: a. Avoiding large, uninterrupted expanses of glass near open areas; b. Prohibiting glass skyways and freestanding glass walls; c. Avoiding transparent glass walls coming together at building corners; d. Prohibiting up -lighting or spotlights; e. Shielding outdoor lights; and f. Utilizing fritted, glazed, and/or low reflective glass 6.2.210 Outdoor Lighting A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to all development and improvements within the Code Boundaries. B. Outdoor Lighting Requirements 1. Site Plan Requirements. A site plan shall include a description of: a. Any lighting fixture not affixed to an existing or proposed building; and b. A proposed or existing lighting fixture that will be located in an adjacent right-of-way. 2. Building Permit Requirement. A building permit application shall include a description of any lighting fixture affixed to an existing or proposed building. A description of a new lighting fixture may include catalog cuts and manufacturer illustrations that demonstrate the lighting fixture will comply with this Section. 3. Fully Shielded and Full Cut-off Light Fixtures Required. A fixture that is fully -shielded and full cut-off is required for an outdoor lighting application that illuminates: a. Public street and pedestrian lighting; b. Parking lots; c. Sidewalks; d. Recreational areas; e. Billboards; f. Product display area lighting; and g. Building overhangs and open canopies. 4. Lighting of Building Facades. a. A fixture that illuminates a building or structure must be fully -shielded and full cut-off. 6-58 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Signage 1 6.2.211 A fixture that illuminates a building fagade may only be used to highlight specific architectural features such as principal entrances and towers. 5. Directional Luminaries. A directional luminaire may be used to illuminate a sign or a flagpole if the luminaire: a. Is installed and aimed to illuminate a specific object or area; and b. Does not shine directly onto neighboring properties or roadways, or distribute excessive light skyward. 6. Lamp or Fixture Substitution. a. After the applicable site plan or building permit is approved or after a site plan exemption is granted, a request to modify or substitute an outdoor lighting fixture or the type of light source shall: (1) Be submitted to the City for approval; and (2) Include documentation that the modification or substitution complies with this division. b. An outdoor lighting fixture or the type of light source may not be modified or substituted unless approved by the City. 6.2.211 Signage A. Applicability. The requirements of this Section apply to all new or modified signage. Table 6.2.211.A (Signage Types Overview) provides an overview of the sign types allowed. 1. New or modified signage, regardless of the nature or location, unless specifically exempted, which is intended to be viewed from a public street, and to signs which are intended to be viewed from outdoors in areas of public and private property used for public pedestrian access. 2. Temporary Signs. Temporary shall be consistent with the requirements of Chapter 19.104 (Signs). Temporary signs on internal streets are allowed on sidewalks immediately adjacent to the advertising business so long as pedestrian or bike movements are not impeded. 3. Exempt Signs. Exempt signs shall follow Chapter 19.104 (Signs) standards. 4. Unless stated otherwise, the requirements of Chapter 19.104 (Signs) apply. B. Master sign program. A master sign program is required, consistent with Chapter 19.104 (Signage) of the Cupertino Municipal Code. Unless otherwise specified, other types of signage, such as way finding signs, building signs, changeable copy signs for movie theaters, and types that require flexible creative criteria may be utilized that are not listed in Table 6.2.211.A (Signage Types Overview). All proposed signage shall be included in and are subject to the City's administrative review and approval of the master sign program. C. Existing Vallco Monument Freeway Sign. The sign is listed in the Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) as a "landmark sign" and is defined in the CMC as "an existing, legal non -conforming ground sign that has a distinctive architectural style" but has no special historical status and therefore may be removed. If removed, no new free-standing freeway oriented sign is allowed. Modifications may be made to modernize, structurally stabilize and update the theme of the development. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-59 6.2.211 1 Signage D. Interpretation. This Section is not intended to, and does not restrict, speech on the basis of its content, viewpoint, or message. No part of this Section shall be construed to favor commercial speech over non-commercial speech. A non-commercial message may be substituted for any commercial message displayed on a sign, or the content of any non- commercial message displayed on a sign may be changed to a different non-commercial message, without the need for any approval or permit, provided that the size of the sign is not altered. To the extent any provision of this Section is ambiguous, the term shall be interpreted not to regulate on the basis of the content of the message. E. Total Sign Area. Each building is allowed the maximum number and sizes of signs allowed by this section. The actual combination and design of each sign type on each building is subject to the City's review and approval. 6-60 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Awning/Canopy Sign 16.2.211.A.1 6.2.211.A.1 Awning/Canopy Sign A pedestrian -oriented sign on an awning or the canopy of a shopfront, that is read along the sidewalk or from the other side of the street. B. Sign Size Canopy Sign Signable Area' 1 sf per linear foot of awning 0 width, max. Lettering Height 16" max. 0 Lettering Thickness 6" max. 71 Sloping Plane on an Awning Signable Area Max. 45% of sloping plane Awning Width Max. 25% coverage of sloping 0 plane Lettering Height 18" max. 7 B. Sign Size (continued) Valance Sign MM Signable Area 75% coverage max. of Q © O Width 60% valance width, max. 0 Height 8" min.; 16" max. Lettering Height 75% of valance height O ' If an awning covers multiple store fronts, each store is allowed a signable area of 75% of the store width. C. Location Clear Height 8' min.; 14' min. over driveways O and alleys Signs per Awning 1 Canopy, or 1 Valance; and 1 Sloping Plane, max. D. Miscellaneous Vinyl or plastic awnings are not allowed. Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-61 6.2.211.A.2 I Changeable Copy Sign 6.2.211.A.2 Changeable Copy Sign A pedestrian -oriented sign that is designed so that characters, letters, numbers, or illustrations can be manually changed or rearranged without altering the face or surface of the sign. This sign may have up to 3 sides when mounted to project from the building. Signable Area Max. 20% of total building wall sign area' Height Clear Height 8' min. O Signs per Building 1 max. Internal illumination permitted. . Permitted only as an integral part of a building -mounted 0 sign. 3max. Q Creative design elements applied to the top and/or bottom of the sign may exceed allowed sign height subject to the City review and approval. Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy. 6-62 Vallee Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Marquee Sign 16.2.211.A.3 6.2.211.A.3 Marquee Sign A vertical sign that is located either along the face, where Signs per 500' Street Frontage 1 max. it projects perpendicular to the facade, or at the corner Marquee signs must be placed at highest story of building of the building, where it projects at a 45 degree angle. Marquee signs may extend beyond the parapet of the Shall only be located along a street frontage. building, or may terminate below the cornice or eave. When located over driveways or alleys, Marquee Signs B. Sign Size must have a minimum clear height of 14'. Signable Area D. Miscellaneous Width 30" max. 0 Neon lettering, upon City review and approval may only Depth 10" max. 0 be used in conjunction with painted lettering; signs Lettering Width 75% of sign width consisting only of neon lettering are not permitted. max. 0 Shall only be located along a street frontage. C. Location Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy. Clear Height above Sidewalk/ 12' min? 0 Ground Extension above Top of Facade 10' max. that Sign is Attached to Projection from Facade 6' max. 0 Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-63 6.2.211.A.4 I Blade Sign 6.2.211.A.4 Blade Sign a N man, ! U ft WM. M4. ovvlfflilillil'�il A pedestrian -oriented sign mounted perpendicular to a building's facade by decorative brackets that may allow the sign to swing slightly, is small in size, and intended to Clear Height 8' min. Projection 4' max. be read along the sidewalk. Signs per 50' of Street Frontage 1 max. Area Width Height Thickness Distance between two 25' min 6 sf per side, max.; Q Projecting Signs 12 sf total, max. D. Miscellaneous 36" max. 36" max. 4" max? Signs that have a three dimensional quality may have a greater thickness subject to approval by the City. Projecting signs must be mounted perpendicular to a 0 building's facade. Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy. JFJ 6-64 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.2.211.A.5 Wall Sign LO-OL122 I L.II N 0 Wall Sign 16.2.211.A.5 1100-1,110I!i A pedestrian -oriented sign mounted flat against the facade consisting of individual cut letters applied directly to the building. Wall Signs are placed above shopfronts and run horizontally along the "expression line," and/ or decorative cornice or sign band at the top of the building. Signs per Frontage 1 max for ground floor, Upper Story Location 1 per Building Projection 8" max. Area 1 sf per linear foot of shopfront width up to 80sf max. 0 Shall not project above the roof or top of parapet, unless it is an integral part of the face of an architectural projection Ground Floor Width Shopfront width, max. Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy. Height 12" min.; 3max. 0 Upper Story Location Width 75% of Facade width Depth 3' to 5' subject to City approval Lettering/Image 75% of signable width, max. 0 Width Lettering/Image Height 75% of signable height or 18" max. (Whichever is lesser) Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-65 6.2.211.A.6 I Window Sign 6.2.211.A.6 Window Sign A pedestrian -oriented sign consisting of individual letters No applicable standards and designs applied directly on the inside of a window. Signable Area (Permanent and Temporary Signs combined) Window Signs must have a clear background. 25% of window surface Neon window sign: 4sf One "open" sign less than 2sf exempt from standards Perimeter neon window signage not allowed Width 75% max. of Shopfront Width 0 Height 36" max. C Note: Image not intended to limit sign message copy. 6-66 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.3: Definitions Table of Contents 6.3.1 Definitions 6-77 6.3.101 Purpose.................................................................................. 6-77 6.3.102 Applicability.............................................................................. 6-77 6.3.103 General Terms and Phrases................................................................ 6-77 Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-67 Definitions This page intentionally left blank 6-68 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 6.3.1 Definitions 6.3.101 Purpose This Section provides definitions of terms and phrases used in this Chapter and in the Specific Plan that are technical or specialized, or that may not reflect common usage. If any of the definitions in this Section conflict with definitions Chapter 19.08 (Definitions) of the Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC), these definitions shall control for the purposes of this Chapter. If a word is not defined in this Section, or in other provisions of this Chapter, please see City of Cupertino standards in Chapter 19.08 (Definitions). 6.3.102 Applicability The definitions in Section 6.3.103 (General Terms and Phrases) apply to all development and improvements within the Town Center Code Boundaries. 6.3.103 General Terms and Phrases A. Definitions Above Ground Structures. Structures/floors whose height is greater than 42 inches above the sidewalk grade along the closest street (which also includes Perimeter Road). Active Ground Floor Uses. Uses that do not require screening of interior spaces, provide visibility into the space through maintaining clear and uncovered windows, create "eyes on the street", create a "face on the street," and allows and benefits from a flow of pedestrians between the use and street frontage. Qualifying uses include retail, personal service and health & fitness as listed in Table 6.2.206.A and is expanded to include bike hubs, mobility hubs, office/residential lobbies, employee/resident amenities and seating areas, cafe/bar areas, and work portion of live/work. Utility, trash and other similar back -of -house functions are not allowed in active ground floor use areas (see Figure 6.2.201.A). Active Ground Floor Use Areas. Streets and areas shown in Figure 6.2.201.A, located on Vallco Parkway (facing 19800 Vallco Parkway), Stevens Creek Boulevard, Wolfe Road (or internal street facing Wolfe Road) on both sides up to one block north of Vallco Parkway, the central street or shopping loop in the Retail & Entertainment/Mixed-use District, the streets around the Town Square and East Plaza (see Figure 6.2.202.A), and the central street in the Neighborhood/Mixed-use District. B. Definitions Bay Window. A window that projects from the building facade or elevation that begins on the ground floor and can extend to upper floors. Block Face. The aggregate of all the Building Facades on one side of a block. The Block Face provides the context for establishing architectural harmony. Block Length. The horizontal distance measured from one end of the block to the other end along the same street. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-69 6.3.103 1 General Terms and Phrases Block Perimeter. The aggregate of all sides of a block measured along the adjacent streets. Block Scale, Building. A building that is individually as large as a block or collectively arranged along a street to form a continuous facade as long as most or all of a block. Buildable Area. The area in which a building is permitted to be constructed. Building. A structure consisting of one or more foundations, floors, walls and roofs that surround an interior space, and may include exterior appurtenant structures such as porches and decks. Building Elevation/Facade. The exterior wall of a building not adjacent to a street, the front or side along a private street, or civic space. Building Entrance. A point of pedestrian ingress and egress to the front of a building along the sidewalk of the street immediately adjacent to the building. Building Form. The overall shape and dimensions of a building. Building Frontage. The length of the lot line of any one premises parallel to and along each street and/or open space which it borders. Building Type. A structure defined by its combination of configuration, disposition and function. C. Definitions Ceiling Height, Ground Floor. The height from finished floor to finished ceiling of primary rooms on the ground floor, not including secondary rooms such as bathrooms, closets, utility rooms and storage spaces. Ceiling Height, Upper Floor(s). The height from finished floor to finished ceiling of primary rooms on the floor(s) above the ground floor, not including secondary rooms such as bathrooms, closets, utility rooms and storage spaces. Chamfered Corner. An external wall of a building joining two perpendicular exterior walls, typically at a symmetrical, 45 degree angle creating a beveled edge to the building rather than a 90 degree corner. Charrette. A multiple -day collaborative design and planning workshop held on-site of the area being planned and inclusive of all affected stakeholders. Civic. A term defining not-for-profit organizations that are dedicated to arts, culture, education, religious activities, recreation, government, transit, and public parking facilities. Civic Building. A structure operated by governmental or not-for-profit organizations and limited to civic and related uses. Commercial. A term defining service and retail uses collectively. Communications Tower. Any structure which supports an antenna. Corner Entry. An entrance located on the corner of a building. 6-70 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 General Terms and Phrases 1 6.3.103 Coworking Space. A facilitated environment which may contain shared facilities such as conference rooms, reception services, phones, and other business amenities. Work spaces are used by a recognized membership who share the site in order to interact and collaborate with each other as part of a community and to reduce duplicated costs by sharing facilities. The uses shall have externally observable attributes similar to uses permitted in the District in which that they are located. Equipment is limited to those which do not generate noise or pollutants in excess of what is customary within a typical office environment. Such space located in a research & development building may use equipment consistent with research & development uses. Coworking space may be interchangeably referred to as "incubator space." D. Definitions Defensible Space. A public, private, or semi -private residential environment whose physical characteristics—building layout and site plan—function to allow inhabitants themselves to become key agents in ensuring their security. Depth, Ground -Floor Space. The distance from the street -facing facade to the rear interior wall of the ground -floor space available to an allowed use. Disposition, Formal. Composed in a formal arrangement, in a regular, classical, and typically symmetrical manner. Disposition, Informal. Composed in an informal character with a mix of formal and natural characteristics. Distance Between Entries. The horizontal distance measured parallel to the facade between entrances to a building or buildings. E. Definitions Efficiency Unit. A type of secondary dwelling designed to be occupied by a limited number of persons in limited space. Elevated Ground Floor. A ground floor situated above the grade plane of the adjacent sidewalk. Encroachment. Any architectural feature, structure or structural element, such as a gallery, fence, garden wall, porch, stoop, balcony, oriel window, bay window, terrace or deck, that breaks the plane of a vertical or horizontal regulatory limit extending into a setback, or beyond the build -to -line into the public frontage, or above a height limit. Entry. An opening, such as a door, passage, or gate, that allows access to a building. Entry, Primary. The opening that allows access to a building directly from the sidewalk along the front facade. Entry, Service. An entrance located toward or at the rear of the building intended for the delivery of goods and removal of refuse. F. Definitions Facade. See Building Elevation/Facade. Facade Zone. The area between the minimum and maximum setback lines along the front of a lot and along the side street of a corner parcel. Fence. A structure made of wire, wood, metal, masonry or other material, and typically used as a screen or enclosure for a yard or open space or as a divider along a lot line. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-71 6.3.103 1 General Terms and Phrases Finish Level, Ground Floor. Height difference between the finished floor on the ground floor and the adjacent sidewalk. In the case of a terrace frontage that serves as the public right-of-way, the floor finish level is the height of the walk above the adjacent street. Regulations for ground floor finish level for ground floor residential uses do not apply to ground floor lobbies and common areas in buildings. Flex Space. A room or group of internally connected rooms designed to accommodate an evolution of use over time in response to an evolving market demand. Typically designed to accommodate future commercial uses, while accommodating less intense short-term uses, such as residential or live/work, until the commercial demand has been established. Floorplate. An area measurement in square feet of either the gross or the rentable floor area of a typical floor in a building. Floorplate, Non-residential. The square footage area measurement of a floorplate dedicated to non-residential uses. Floorplate, Residential. The square footage area measurement of a floorplate dedicated to residential uses. Footprint. The outline of the area of ground covered by the foundations of a building or structure. Freestanding Wall. A wall that is separate from a building and supported by independent means. Front. See Lot Line, Front. Frontage. A strip or extent of land abutting a street or public open space. 1. Frontage, Private. The area between the building facade and the shared lot line between the street and the lot. Frontage, Public. The area between the curb of the vehicular lanes and the edge of the street. Frontage Line. The lot line(s) of a lot fronting a street or public open space. Frontage Type. See Section 6.2.205 (Frontages). G. Definitions Glazing. Openings in a building in which glass is installed. Gross Floor Area. The total floor area inside the building envelope, including the external walls, but not including the roof. Ground Floor. The floor of a building located nearest to the level of the ground around the building. 6-72 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 General Terms and Phrases 1 6.3.103 H. Definitions Height. The distance measured from closest adjacent street to top of cornice, parapet, or eave line of a peaked roof with the following exceptions: 1. Mechanical equipment and utility structures. Rooftop mechanical equipment may exceed height limitations if they are: Enclosed, generally centrally located on the roof and not visible from adjacent streets; Screened from public view; and Provided with measures where possible with reasonable efforts to buffer noise from adjacent existing residential uses. 2. Small amenity structures such as, clubhouses or cafeterias, located in public or private rooftop open spaces areas may exceed height limitations if they are: Generally centrally located on the roof and not visible from adjacent streets; No more than 5% of the open space area within which they are located or 5,000 square feet total, whichever is less; and No taller than 12 feet above the maximum allowed heights. Hotel. A facility containing guest rooms or suites, used by guests on a transient occupancy basis, less than thirty (30) days. Also includes guest amenities such as swimming pools, gyms, restaurants, bars, meetings rooms, etc. House Scale Building. A building that is the size of a house and set apart from other buildings with setbacks. I. Definitions Improvement. The product of any modification to a lot, structure or building. J. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter J are defined at this time. K. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter K are defined at this time. L. Definitions Landing. A level area at the top or bottom of a staircase or between one flight of stairs and another. Lined Building. A two-part building consisting of an exterior occupiable building specifically designed to mask the interior building from a street or public open space. The interior building consists of a parking structure or a building with few windows. Live/work. Units that combine and accommodate both residential and the place of business for the resident(s) of the unit. Typically characterized with having the "work' function at the ground level and the "live" function on upper levels. Loading Dock(s). A platform where cargo from vehicles or trains can be loaded or unloaded. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-73 6.3.103 1 General Terms and Phrases M. Definitions Main Body. The primary massing of a building. Main Facade. The front facade of a building Major. Having a greater size, scope, effect, characteristic or quality relative to the other corresponding sizes, scopes, effects, characteristics or qualities; or being the greater of two or more. Massing. The overall shape or arrangement of the bulk or volume of a building. Minor. Having a lesser size, scope, effect, characteristic or quality relative to the average size, scope, effect, characteristic or qualities; or being the lesser of two or more. Mixed -Use, Walkable Urban. Multiple functions within the same building in a context where walking and bicycling to daily destinations is a viable option. Mixed -Use, Auto -oriented Suburban. Multiple functions within the same building or the same general area in a context where driving to daily destinations is the viable option. N. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter N are defined at this time. O. Definitions Office Amenity Space. Non-employee, non -traffic -generating uses that are not easily convertible to employee -generating uses such as exterior covered walkways, lobby atriums, large cafeteria and employee lounge areas, employee fitness areas, anechoic chambers, and laboratories. Open Space, Private. A portion of a development held in common and/or single ownership and not reserved for the exclusive use or benefit of an individual tenant or owner and is available for use by all occupants of the building. Open Space, Publicly Accessible. An outdoor area dedicated for public gathering and civic activities. Oriel Window. A window that projects from the building facade or elevation, located on upper floors and may extend for multiple stories. Overhead Doors. Doors constructed in horizontally hinged sections that are equipped with hardware that rolls the sections into an overhead position, clear of the opening. 6-74 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 General Terms and Phrases 1 6.3.103 P. Definitions Parapet. A wall along the edge of a roof or the portion of a wall that extends above the roof line. Parking Driveway Width. The horizontal measurement of an access driveway to a parking area, measured perpendicular to the direction of travel. Pedestrian -oriented Retail. General commercial businesses that allow customers to park once and complete multiple transactions and visits on foot. The overall intent is establish a character of a shopping and entertainment area that encourages people to walk instead of drive. Planting Strips. A landscaped or grassy area located between a street and a sidewalk. Podium. A continuous projecting base or pedestal under a building often occupied by parking. Podium Top. A flat, elevated and open area above a podium that can be used as common area. Public Use. A use undertaken by a political subdivision, its agents or assigns. Q. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter Q are defined at this time. R. Definitions Rear. Opposite of front. Rear Loaded (Rear Access). Lots that provide vehicular access from the rear of the lot. Recessed Entry. An entrance to a building that is set back from the facade of the building. Regulating Plan. A map for a development that identifies the zoning standards to be applied to specific locations. Retail. Businesses that provide products and services (including restaurants) which are for sale to the general public. Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-75 6.3.103 1 General Terms and Phrases S. Definitions Semi -Public Use. A use owned or operated by a non-profit organization, private institution or foundation. Service Entries. Building access for service providers. Setback, Building. The mandatory clear distance between a lot line and a building. Setback Lines. Lines to regulate the placement of buildings, accessory structures and their improvements with respect to streets, alleys and property lines. Setback, Parking. The mandatory clear distance between a lot line and parking. Shared Parking. Any parking spaces assigned to more than one user, where different persons utilizing the spaces are unlikely to need the spaces at the same time of day. Sidewalk. A paved area along a street intended exclusively for pedestrian use and often installed between a street and lot frontages. Single Loaded, Building. A building containing dwellings and/or commercial suites without common hallways for access to the dwellings and/or suites. Site. One or more adjacent lots under common ownership. Street, Front. Street located along the front lot line. Street, Side. Street located along a lot line that is not along the front lot line. Storefront. The portion of a shopfront frontage composed of the display window and/or entrance and its components, including windows, doors, transoms and sill pane. Street. A public or permanent private thoroughfare which affords a primary means of access to property. Street Frontage, Principal. The length of the property line of any one premises parallel to and along the public right-of-way which it borders and which is identified by an officially assigned street address. Street Tree. A tree of any species or size planted in open spaces, parkways, sidewalk areas, easements, and streets. Structure. An improvement permanently attached to real property. Structure, Accessory. A subordinate structure, the use of which is incidental and secondary to that of the main structure on the same lot. T. Definitions Tandem Parking. A parking space deep enough to allow two cars to park, one behind the other. Transit Station. A lot or structure used for the purpose of parking, loading and unloading freight and passengers from public transportation. May include parking facilities and other commercial amenities to service transit passengers. Transit Stop. A location where buses stop to load and unload passengers. A transit stop sometimes includes a shelter or a dedicated platform along the sidewalk. 6-76 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 General Terms and Phrases 1 6.3.103 U. Definitions Understory. The smaller trees and shrubs below the canopy of large trees. Unit. A discrete portion of a building. Upper Floor. A floor in a building containing habitable space that is located above the ground floor. Use. The purpose for which land, premises or structure thereon is designed, arranged, or intended, or for which it is or may be occupied or used. V. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter V are defined at this time. W. Definitions Walkability. The condition when an area is highly interconnected to other areas and appeals to pedestrians for recreational walking or for walking to work, transit, errands, shopping, or restaurants. Wall Plane. A vertical surface defined by the facades of buildings. Width -to -Height Ratio. The ratio of the horizontal size of a space measured perpendicularly to the vertical height of a building. Wings, Secondary. A structure physically attached to, and secondary and incidental to, the Main Body of a building. X. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter X are defined at this time. Y. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter Y are defined at this time. Z. Definitions No specialized terms beginning with the letter Z are defined at this time Public Review Draft - August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 6-77 hrases 6-78 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft - August 2018 Public Review Draft — August 2018 Administration, mplementation and Financing In this chapter 7.1 Administration 7.2 Approval Authority 7.3 Application Process 7.4 Findings for Permit Approval 7.5 Construction Sequencing 7.6 Financing and Maintenance of Public Improvements 7.7 Financing Plan This chapter discusses the development review procedures by the City of Cupertino applicable to the Specific Plan. A process for modifications and amendments to the Specific Plan is discussed, as well as financing for implementation of the Specific Plan. CHAPTER 7 7-02 7-04 7-06 7-09 7-12 7-13 7-16 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-01 Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.1 Administration Except as otherwise provided in this section, Development Review is required prior to any new construction, modifications to building exteriors or site improvements, and changes in land use. Development applications within the plan area shall be reviewed for conformance with the Specific Plan, other applicable plans and ordinances and, as applicable, a Development Agreement. Any issues not addressed in the Specific Plan shall be subject to the Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) unless otherwise indicated in this Specific Plan, or, if applicable, a Development Agreement. To the extent any standard or other provision in the CMC conflicts with the Specific Plan, the standard or other provision in the Specific Plan shall control. Permits - Applicability The City will review and consider approval of planning entitlement permits, building and other permits and relocation of public utility and access easements, to implement the Specific Plan. Demolition of the existing structures and all grading on the site must be done in compliance with the Mitigation Measures, Conditions of Approval and Standard Permit Conditions identified in the certified Vallco Special Area Specific Plan EIR ('Specific Plan EIR'). There are three permit types that are required to prior to development of structures on the site. These are: Master Site Development Permit (MSDP) Any project proposed in the Plan Area south of Perimeter Road will be required to submit an application for a MSDP in order to ensure a cohesive, coordinated development and implementation of the Specific Plan. If a project proposed south of Perimeter Road also includes proposed development in the area north of Perimeter Road, the entire project shall be required to be included in the MSDP application. 2. Development Permit (DP) The outlying parcels north of Perimeter Road may be permitted to submit an application for a Development Permit if they are not proposed for development concurrently with parcels south of Perimeter Road and required to apply for an MSDP. 3. Architectural and Site Approval (ASA) Applicable to all development within the Plan Area subsequent to the approval of an MSDP or DP (as applicable). An application for ASA may be submitted for processing concurrently with an application for an MSDP or DP. Architectural and Site Approval is required prior to approval of building permits for vertical construction to implement the design standards in the specific plan by determining the final architecture, site and landscape improvements, etc. for buildings, and open spaces. 7-02 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing Other permits may be required as follows: Adjustments (ADJ) Applicable when an applicant requests an adjustment to development standards within the Specific Plan. Applications that result in an increase in building height, or a reduction in setbacks along the western boundary of the Plan Area or a reduction in the total acreage of at -grade publicly accessible open space shall require amendment(s) to the Specific Plan. 2. MSDP Amendment Applicable when an applicant wishes to modify aspects of an approved MSDP such as street layout, grades, locations and massing of buildings, the location and size of publicly accessible open spaces, etc. 3. DP Amendment Applicable when an applicant wishes to modify some aspects of an approved DP. 4. Modification (DIR) Applicable when an applicant wishes to modify aspects of an approved MSDP, DP, or ASA and it is deemed to not require an MSDP Amendment, DP Amendment, a new ASA, or Transfers pursuant to Chapter 19.164 of the CMC. 5. Transfers of Development Allocations (TRN) Applicable when an applicant wishes to request that the City consider transfer of development allocations within or between Development Allocation Areas within the Plan Area. Participating properties must be within the boundary of a proposed or approved MSDP. Applications that result in an increase in building height, or a reduction in setbacks around the western boundary of the Plan Area or reduction in the total acreage of at -grade publicly accessible open space shall require amendment(s) to the Specific Plan. 6. Other All other permits, processes and agreements required to implement the Specific Plan shall be processed as required by the CMC, adopted City policy or prevalent practice. Consistent with state law, a Development Agreement between any person having a legal or equitable interest in the property and the City of Cupertino may also be entered into, but is only required for projects applying for the "community benefits density bonus" (Tier 2 development). Any Development Agreement will be processed pursuant to the requirements of Chapter 19.144 of the CMC. A Development Agreement may expedite procedures for consideration and issuance of permits and approvals. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-03 Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.2 Approval Authority Table 7.1 shows the approval authority, noticing radius, type of public meeting, signage requirements, expiration date and extension dates for projects; provided, however, that if a Development Agreement is processed and approved pursuant to the requirements of Chapter 19.144 of the Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC), then the project entitlement's expiration date may be modified as set forth in the Development Agreement. For all required permit types not identified in Table 7.1 of this Specific Plan, please refer to the CMC ApprovalTable 7.1. Type of Permit Administrative Planning City Public Noticing Posted Site Expiration or Decision ASB Review Commission Council Hearing/ Radius DQE Notice °•F Date O Public - Meeting c MMA Area south of R F PM 300' Yes 4 years current Perimeter Road - Master Site Development Permit (MSDP) Parcels north of Processed pursuant to Cupertino Municipal Code Chapter 19.12. current Perimeter If combined with the area south of Perimeter Road, must be processed with a MSDP Road -Development Permit " Architectural and F A' Az PM Adjacent Yes Greater of 2 Site Approval 1,0 years or life of MSDP Adjustment(s)',O F A'/F Az PM 300' Yes Greater of 2 years or life of MSDP Transfers of F A'/F A'/Az PM 300' Yes Greater of 2 Development years or life Allocations K•L of MSDP 7-04 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing Table 7.1. Approval E Type of Permit or Administrative Planning City Public Noticing Posted Site Expiration Decision A,8 Review Commission Council Hearing/ Radius 1,E Notice °•r Date G Public Meeting c MSDP Amendment, F A' PM 300' Yes Greater of 2 Major K years or life of MSDP MSDP Amendment, F A' Az PM 300' Yes Greater of 2 Minor KX0 years or life of MSDP Modification F - A - None No Greater of 2 years or life of MSDP Key R - Review and recommendation body F - Final decision-making body unless appealed A' - Appeal Body on first appeal Az - Appeal Body on second appeal A - Permits can be processed concurrently with other applications, at the discretion of the Director of Community Development. PH - Public Hearing PM - Public Meeting B - Projects with combined applications shall be processed at the highest level of approval in conformance with Cupertino Municipal Code Section 19.04.090. C - Public Hearing (PH): Projects types that need noticing pursuant to the CA Government Code; Public Meeting (PM): Project types that need only a mailed notice and no newspaper notices. D - Noticing and Site Signage shall be in conformance with Cupertino Municipal Code Section 19.12.110. E - Noticing Radius of an application in a combined application shall correspond to the maximum noticing radius required for any one of the applications. F - Posted Site Signage of an application in a combined application shall correspond to the maximum required for any one of the applications. G - Expiration date of an approval processed in a combined application shall correspond to the maximum expiration date allowed for any one of the development applications (not including Subdivision Map Act applications, General Plan Amendments and Zoning Map or Text Amendments.) H - Type of Development Permit is dependent on the size of the project proposed pursuant to the requirements of Cupertino Municipal Code Section 19.12.030. I - Type of Architectural and Site Approval Permit is dependent on proposed project pursuant to the requirements of Municipal Code Section 19.12.030. J - Planning Commission review is only required for applications that result in adjustments greater than 10% of a numerical development standard. K - Subject to any necessary environmental review and incorporation of appropriate mitigations. L - Planning Commission review is required for applications with transfers that result in a transfer of greater than 25% of the allocation for that use type in the Specific Plan. Transfers are allowed without amending the Specific Plan. M - Applications that result in an increase in building height, or a reduction in setbacks around the west boundary of the Plan Area or reduction in the total acreage of at -grade publicly accessible open space shall require amendment(s) to the Specific Plan. N - Minor MSDP Amendments involve amendments to an approved MSDP that substantially conform to the original approval. O - If a project is subject to a Development Agreement, the City Council will be the first and final Appeal Body. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-05 Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.3 Application Process Application Materials Applications may be made by the owner of record (or agent), and must be filed with the Director of Community Development. In addition to the then applicable application or processing fee, applications must include the following materials, unless waived by the Director of Community Development based on the scope of the proposal. The Director of Community Development may reasonably require additional information which is pertinent and essential to the application. A. Master Site Development Permit • A complete legal description of the subject property and map showing the location of the property for which the permit is sought. • A preliminary title report of the subject property. • The proposed conceptual site development plan indicating: 1. Proposed development program 2. Site plan 3. Location of: a) All buildings and structures, including building massing and establishment of building pads. b) Parking facilities for the overall program proposed by type. c) Streets, roads, driveways, alleys and access points. d) Public open spaces by type including conceptual program and improvements for publicly accessible open space. e) Any undeveloped site(s) for future phase(s) including provisions for interim landscaping and other attractive improvements, and security and maintenance of any undeveloped land to be developed under future construction. f) Stormwater management facilities f) Public Art (conceptual location) in conformance with Chapter 19.148 of the Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC). g) Plaques in compliance with the General Plan to recognize the site as a Community Landmark. 4. Location and types of land uses 5. Location and programming of mobility hub 6. Modifications to existing buildings 7. Streetscape and mobility improvements 8. Utility infrastructure 9. Grading 10. General landscaping scheme • A topographical map of the Plan Area and the neighboring properties. • A conceptual construction sequencing plan. • Indicate compliance with the adopted Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program and the Specific Plan. 7-06 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing B. Development Permit Consistent with the requirements of Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) Chapter 19.12 and Section 19.156.010. C. Architectural and Site Approval • Architectural drawings of the proposed development, building additions or other structures. Drawings shall indicate square footages, building height, number of stories, parking, exterior materials, colors, window treatment and other architectural features. • Color Renderings of exterior facades • Material boards. • A landscape plan. Adjustment Applications • Plans clearly indicating the location of the adjustment(s) being requested. Calculations indicating by what percentage the development standard is being proposed to be adjusted. • A justification statement for why the adjustment is being requested. Why the requested adjustment(s) is the minimum required to achieve the project objectives while complying with the goals and vision of the Specific Plan and all other development standards and guidelines. • Why the requested adjustment(s) achieve an improvement to achieving the goals and vision of the Specific Plan as well as the architectural design and streetscape experience as compared to the previously approved project. Transfer of Development Allocation Applications • Plans clearly indicating the locations to and from which transfers are being proposed. The amount of the transfer and change from the Development Allocation Area. A statement for why the transfer is being requested. Why the requested transfer(s) is the minimum required to achieve the project objectives while complying with the goals and vision of the Specific Plan and all other development standards and guidelines. Action by Director Upon receipt of an application for a permit, the Director of Community Development shall act in compliance with the CMC Section 19.12.090. Decision The Approval Authority will render a decision in compliance with CMC Section 19.12.100. Noticing The City shall cause appropriate noticing by permit type identified in Table 7.1 in Section 7.2 of this chapter in compliance with CMC Section 19.12.110. Action by Approval Authority The appropriate Approval Authority identified in Table 7.1, will act in compliance with CMC Section 19.12.120,19.12.130 and 19.12.140, as applicable. Notice of Decision and Reports The Notice of Decision shall be transmitted in compliance with Section 19.12.150A and reporting shall occur pursuant to CMC Section 19.12.150B. Effective Date The Effective Date of all permits shall be in compliance with CMC Section 19.12.160. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-07 Appeals Appeals may be filed and processed pursuant to Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC) Section 19.12.170. The Appeal Hearing Body shall be determined in accordance with Table 7.1. The Notice of Decision of an Appeal shall be transmitted in compliance with CMC Section 19.12.170. Expiration and Extensions Expiration: Approval on a permit shall become null and void and of no effect, upon expiration of the time frame specified in Table 7.1, unless a shorter or longer time period is prescribed in the conditions of the permit or a Development Agreement, unless: A building permit has been filed and accepted by the City (fees paid and permit number issued). In the event that a building permit expires for any reason, the permit shall become null and void. In the event a building permit is issued, a permit shall be deemed "vested" only when sufficient building activity has occurred and continues to occur in a diligent manner. 2. Extensions: A permit may be extended for the time frame specified in Table 7.1, upon timely submittal of an application with the Director of Community Development, prior to expiration and indicating the reasons for the delay in project commencement. Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing Parcelization Limited parcelization is permitted in connection with approval of a Master Site Development Permit to promote a mix of rental and ownership residential options, and facilitate the development of subsidized affordable housing and senior housing. Consideration may be given to accommodate development phasing and financing. If a Development Agreement is entered into, the Development Agreement may include additional details regarding a specific parcelization plan. 7-08 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.4 Findings for Permit Approval In approving the Specific Plan, the City has determined that the Specific Plan is in the public interest and will advance the health, safety, and general welfare of the City of Cupertino and is consistent with the City's Comprehensive General Plan (Community Vision 2040). Findings for Master Site Development Permit Approval The Master Site Development Permit may be approved if all of the following findings can be made: 1. The proposed development includes at least eighty-five percent (85%) of the maximum residential units permitted under the Specific Plan. 2. The proposed development and land uses are consistent with the goals, policies, purpose, vision, and development standards contained in the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan. 3. The proposed development and land uses, at the proposed locations, will not be detrimental or injurious to property or improvements in the vicinity, and will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, general welfare; provided, however, that if a project is eligible for the "community benefits density bonus" and subject to a Development Agreement, this finding shall not be used as a basis to reduce the development program shown in Table 3.3, condition a project such that it is physically or financially infeasible to develop the development program shown in Table 3.3, or frustrate the implementation of the goals, policies, purpose, vision, development standards and guidelines contained in the Vallco Town Center Specific Plan. 4. The proposed development and land uses will be located and conducted in a manner that is in accordance with the Cupertino General Plan, this Specific Plan, and applicable regulations. The proposed development and land uses comply with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) by incorporating all measures identified in applicable adopted environmental documents. Findings for Architectural and Site Approval The Architectural and Site Approval Permit may be approved if all the following findings can be made: 1. The application conforms with the Specific Plan and applicable regulations 2. The proposed project conforms with the standard conditions of approval and environmental mitigations. 3. The proposed design, appearance, and general quality of the proposed development and the proposed materials, textures, colors and details of construction and plant material meet or exceed the design standards and guidelines in the Specific Plan. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-09 Findings for Development Permit The Development Permit may be approved if the findings in CMC 19.156.040 can be made. Findings for Modification The Modification may be approved if proposed development is otherwise consistent with the City's General Plan and with this Specific Plan. Findings for Adjustment In order to provide design flexibility in situations where unique circumstances make it impossible to adhere to the development standards and where all efforts to meet the standards have been exhausted, an applicant for development may file an application for adjustment to seek approval to deviate from the standards. The possibility of consolidation of lots lots under the same ownership, if an adjustment(s) is needed for a substandard parcel, shall be evaluated. An adjustment from development standards can be approved if the final approval authority for a project makes all of the following findings: 1. The proposed development is otherwise consistent with the City's General Plan and with the goals of this Specific Plan. 2. The proposed development requires an adjustment, which involves a minor modification of, or deviation from, the development standards in this Specific Plan, and still promotes the vision of the General Plan and Specific Plan. 3. The proposed development will not be injurious to property or improvements in the area nor be detrimental to public health and safety. Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 4.The proposed development will not create a hazardous condition for pedestrian, bike and vehicular traffic. 5. The proposed development has legal access to public streets and public services are available to serve the development. Findings for Transfer of Development Allocation Permit A Transfer of Development Allocation Permit may be approved only if the following findings can be made: The proposed development is otherwise consistent with the City's General Plan and with the Specific Plan (except for the development program shown in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 of Chapter Three: Vision). 2. The proposed transfer will not be injurious to property or improvements in the area nor be detrimental to public health and safety. 3. The proposed development will not create a hazardous condition for pedestrian, bike and vehicular traffic. Enforcement The City shall enforce the provisions of this Specific Plan consistent with City customary practices and consistent with the provisions of the General Plan and Cupertino Municipal Code (CMC). It shall be unlawful for any person to initiate any vertical development work within the Plan Area without first obtaining permits. Whenever in this Specific Plan any act is prohibited or is made or declared to be unlawful, or the doing of any acts required, or the failure to do any act is determined to be unlawful, the City of Cupertino retains its authority under the CMC to enforce such violation or offense. 7-10 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing Severability If any provision of this Specific Plan or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held to be unconstitutional or otherwise invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, the invalidity shall not affect the Specific Plan provisions, clauses or applications which can be implemented without the invalid provision, clause or application, and to this end the provisions and clauses of this Specific Plan are declared to be severable as set forth in this Specific Plan. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-77 Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.5 Construction Sequencing The Specific Plan may be implemented over time and in a sequenced approach as approved in the MSDP or DP as applicable. The anticipated sequence of Plan Area construction is as follows Stage 1. Retail and Entertainment/ Mixed - Use District. Stage 2. The Neighborhood/ Mixed -Use District and the Office/ Mixed -Use District are expected to be completed in a similar time frame. Stage 3. Streets/ at -grade level publicly accessible open spaces are expected to be completed within 12 months of completion of construction in each district. This will provide time to complete the paving and landscaping work after construction trucks and material have been moved off the site. Stage 4. Below Market -Rate units. The phasing of such units shall be consistent with the City's BMR Mitigation Manual unless otherwise approved as part of the MSDP or DP. For example, tax -credit BMR projects or those requiring multiple funding sources may be allowed to be sequenced based on the funding source requirements and schedule. It should be noted that this sequencing may be subject to change to accommodate phasing plans approved in an MSDP or DP or Development Agreement. Other provisions and requirements include: Except as described in this section and consistent with the approved MSDP, DP or Development Agreement, all or any portion of the existing development is permitted to remain in place and continue in commercial use, such that at any time the Plan Area may be improved partially with all or some of the existing buildings and partially with new development. Any undeveloped site(s) for future phase(s) shall include provisions for interim landscaping and other attractive improvements, and security and maintenance of any undeveloped land to be developed under future construction. 2. Parking shall be provided consistent with the requirements of the Specific Plan such that adequate parking is provided for each of the phases as they occur. 3. Staging of construction equipment and vehicles would primarily be required to be on-site with some staging within the public right-of-way for any improvements in the right of way subject to the review and approval of traffic control plans by the Department of Public Works 7-12 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.6 Financing and Maintenance of Public Improvements Implementation of the Specific Plan requires the Specific Plan applicant(s), property owner(s) or their designee(s) to assure that all on- and off-site infrastructure, facilities, and services (improvements) required by this Specific Plan are installed, constructed, and completed prior to or concurrent with need. The improvements include, among others, enhancement, and ongoing maintenance of open space and private roadways. The improvements contemplated for the Plan Area may consist of elements for use by the general public, as well as for exclusive use of the property owner, tenants, or occupants. Once constructed, long-term maintenance of improvements will be required, and the party responsible for maintaining those improvements may vary depending on whether they are dedicated for general public use or privately owned within the Plan Area. While a variety of financing techniques are available, Specific Plan development components will be installed or constructed using private financing for the majority of the development costs. Certain elements of the improvements, however, may use assessments or community facility district mechanisms. If used to fund improvements, the assessment or community facility district will only apply to the Plan Area and only be assessed against the property owners, tenants, or occupants thereof. No resident or property owner outside of the Plan Area will be included in any proposed assessment or community facility district providing required facilities to the Plan Area. These provisions ensure that the Specific Plan pays its own way. This section identifies potential financing methods that may be used individually, collectively, or in combination to fund implementation and maintenance of various improvements identified in the Specific Plan. The Specific Plan's implementation will be complemented by these improvements and directly serve and benefit not only the Plan Area, but also the greater community. This section of the Specific Plan identifies a mix of financing mechanisms applicable to future development in the Plan Area. These mechanisms are important to assure the timely financing of new improvements concurrent with Specific Plan development. The Specific Plan allowable financing mechanisms may include offers of dedication, fee dedications, and/ or easements; assessment districts; infrastructure financing districts (for example: open space management/ maintenance, lighting and landscaping, bridge and thoroughfares), reimbursement agreements. Allowable Specific Plan financing mechanisms also may include offers of dedication, fee dedications, and/ or easements, assessment districts, infrastructure financing districts (for example open space management/ maintenance, lighting and landscaping, bridge and thoroughfares), and reimbursement agreements. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-13 The primary financing mechanisms to be used within the Plan Area are described further below. Recorded Covenants among Plan Area Owners Covenants, conditions and restrictions (CC&Rs) and reciprocal easement agreements are private agreements among property owners used to allocate payment for certain costs among various property owners, most frequently used for the maintenance of common areas. The recording of CC&Rs against a property creates a permanent obligation that can be enforced against the property owner by other owners. For example, the CC&Rs could require that maintenance of the open space and stormwater facilities in the Plan Area be funded by development throughout the Plan Area. The CC&Rs would not be susceptible to unilateral amendment by the owner of the burdened property, and in the event of a breach by the burdened property owner, the other parties to the CC&Rs would have an array of enforceable remedies. The CC&Rs would be approved by the City and would include provisions to require City approval prior to any changes to the CC&R's. Development Impact Fees The City requires payments of impact or development fees to finance public improvements. These fees compensate the community for the extra costs of public improvements caused by new development. These fees are often payable either upon recordation of a final subdivision map, issuance of a building permit, or at a different time if negotiated in a Development Agreement, with the proceeds placed in a fund designated by the City for the construction of certain improvements. Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing Generally, fees are collected to fund traffic mitigation, parks and recreation facilities, fire facilities and services, schools, drainage and flood control facilities, and water and sewer facilities. The fee schedule is generally updated annually through a consumer price index adjustment. Private Financing Most typically, developers receive private debt and equity financing from a variety of lenders to pay for public improvements as part of the construction of a project. Terms vary greatly depending on current interest rates, type of lender and other factors. This financing mechanism will pay for the majority of the public improvements required for the implementation of the Specific Plan. All developments shall be required to join the Plan Area Transportation Management Association (TMA), and property owners shall ensure that all tenants are TMA members in perpetuity. Private financing will be used to establish the TMA and to fund its ongoing operation, with cost allocations divided under agreements between the project users. Financing for Below Market Rate Units These may include a variety of sources including private financing, tax credit financing and other governmental sources, etc. Below Market Rate housing financing often requires layering of multiple sources of funds. Federal, state, and local government funding sources can include the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the California Department of Housing and Community Development, the California Housing Finance Agency, and local funding mechanisms such as County 7-14 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing Measure A funds and housing trust funds. In addition, federal and state low income HUD -administered programs that may be housing tax credits provide a significant available include: Section 8 Certificates and source of funding for private development of Vouchers, Community Development Block affordable housing. Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership (HOME), and the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (HEARTH) Programs. Common state funding programs include: Multifamily Housing Program (MHP), State Proposition 1C programs (including the Infill Infrastructure Grant Program, and the Transit Oriented Development Housing Program), and the Affordable Housing Sustainable Communities grant program. Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-15 Chapter 7 — Administration, Implementation and Financing 7.7 Financing Plan Table 7.2: Improvements and Financing, summarizes on- and off-site improvements required to be in place prior to, or concurrent with need, as well as a description of the allowable financing mechanisms. This summary of allowable financing mechanisms is provided as a guideline; actual implementation of specific financing mechanisms will be accomplished pursuant to established procedures, laws, and regulations applicable to such financing mechanisms. Parks and Open Space Private financing • Private Endowment • Dedication • CC&Rs Traffic Improvements Community Benefits Drainage and Stormwater Management Water and Sewer Systems Schools Below Market -rate units • Traffic impact fees for projects in TIF program • Reimbursement agreement(s) • Private financing • TMA user agreement(s) • Private financing • Private endowment • Private financing • Impact fees • CC&Rs • Private financing • Capacity and connection fees • CC&Rs • Impact fees • Private financing • Tax credit financing • Private financing • Other non-profit sources • Government sources 7-16 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 Chapter 7—Administration, Implementation and Financing Public Review Draft — August 2018 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan 7-17 7-18 Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Public Review Draft — August 2018 EXHIBIT SPA -2 CITY OF IM CUPERTINO COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT PLANNING DIVISION CITY HALL 10300 TORRE AVENUE • CUPERTINO, CA 95014-3255 TELEPHONE: (408) 777-3308 • FAX: (408) 777-3333 CUPERTINO.ORG 8/30/2018 and 9/10/2018 Public Review Draft - Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Clarifying/supplemental language and errata GLOBAL: All spelling and sequential numbering errors and formatting errors will be corrected in the final Specific Plan and are not listed here. Naming conventions within text and graphics will be corrected for consistency throughout document, including: General Plan Special Area name: Vallco Town Center Special Area Specific Plan name: Vallco Town Center Specific Plan Zone name: Vallco Town Center Zone Plaza on west side of Plan Area: Town Square Plaza on east side of Plan Area: East Plaza • Downtown: the word "downtown" will be replaced with either "Plan Area," "District," "neighborhood" or "Town Center" as applicable to the context. • Graphics depicting Plan Area boundaries for conceptual and regulatory plans will be edited for consistency of Plan Area boundaries to not include I-280 and I- 280 on ramp. • Chapter 6 Street sections. Delete "Public frontage assembly" where streets are internal and private, and include in lane assembly. • Use term bicycle lane and not cycle track. Where applicable for internal streets correct to say multi -use path. • Highlighted text indicates edits added as of 9/10/2018 CHAPTER 1 Page Edit 1-23 Charrette Two included a presentation on the latest statistics on school enrollment by the ono Fremont Union High School District. 2-12 Term "lodging" replaced with "hotel" CHAPTER 2 Page Edit 2-11 2-12 Term "lodging" replaced with "hotel" CHAPTER 3 Page Edit 3-12, 3-13, 3-17 Notes to all reference to building stories: stories are approximate, depending upon the plate height of each floor. Ground floor plate height is presumed to be 11 feet minimum for the Neighborhood/Mixed-Use District and 16 feet minimum for the Retail and Entertainment/Mixed-Use District and Office/Mixed-Use District, -3-14 feet,. Upper floors may be approximately 11 feet. This is the Tier One vision. Tier Two vision is further explained in development program section which allows additional heights to accommodate community benefits. Stories are approximated as a range and text to be edited to be consistent as: Max height: Approximate stories 45 feet: ~ 4 stories 60 feet: - 5 to 5.5 stories 75 feet: - 6-7 stories 85 feet: - 7-8 stories 95: ~8-8.5 stories 120 feet: ~10 stories 150 feet: ~13 stories The vision statement is not regulatory, but rather narrates how development standards were distilled from the vision. Apart from the Tier 1 and Tier 2 development program requirements in Section 3.4, all other development standards are in Chapter 6. Final development plans or master site development permits shall meet the height limits in Chapter 6, Figure 6.2.203.A: Building Height Regulating Plan. 3-15, Following Community Benefits Density Bonus. A Community Benefits Density table 3.3 and Bonus is available for projects in a portion of the Plan Area that add to provide specified community benefits in addition to complying with definition page the Specific Plan's standard requirements. 6-70. The development standards defined in Section 6.2 of this Specific Plan allow residential development at a maximum density of 35 dwelling units per acre (Tier 1), plus an increase available for projects that meet all of the standards of State Density Bonus Law (California Government Code Section 65915 et seq.) and Cupertino Municipal Code Chapter 19.56. The Specific Plan also allows a mix of retail and office uses as shown in Table 3.2. A Community Benefits Density Bonus (Tier 2) is an alternative to the State Density Bonus Law that allows an increase to the overall development potential of the Plan Area above the maximum amount of development otherwise permitted by this Specific Plan. The Community Benefits Density Bonus (required to be approved in conjunction with a Development Agreement) is available to projects in a defined area that include specified public benefits, including more affordable housing than would be provided to qualify for a State Density Bonus. The Community Benefit Density Bonus provides both a residential density bonus and additional office square footage substantially in excess of the benefits provided by State Density Bonus Law. Consequently, if a project elects to apply for a Community Benefits Density Bonus, the project may not seek or receive a density bonus, nor any waivers, incentives, concessions, or parking reductions provided under either State Density Bonus Law (California Government Code Section 65915 et seq.) or Cupertino Municipal Code Chapter 19.56, unless explicitly provided for by this Specific Plan. Table 3.2 defines the maximum development potential within the Specific Plan area for base projects (Tier 1), and Table 3.3 does the same for projects with a Community Benefits Density Bonus (Tier 2). Only properties in Development Allocation Area B, as shown the figure below, are eligible to apply for the Community Benefits Density Bonus. An applicant shall be required to apply for a development agreement to memorialize the details and timeframe for providing the required community benefits and any other contributions in connection with the increased development potential available using the Community Benefits Density Bonus. To be eligible for a Community Benefits Density Bonus, the community benefits agreed to in a Development Agreement must include (1) at least 11% of the base density restricted to very low income households and additional affordable housing beyond the standard requirement of 15% of the total residential development program, (2) a commitment to support civic and/or, cultural uses, which may be provided in the project, off-site, and/or through monetary payments, (3) multi -modal transportation benefits, (4) support for local school districts; and (5) any other benefits mutually agreed to that exceed standard code requirements in a development agreement. KEY TO DEVELOPMENT ALLOCATION AREA: add Assessor Parcel Numbers to this legend. IL .i ` 1 Apple Park campua 1 J g Cupertino Village i — �- w .11 9 North Blaney neighborhood yC Mai n Street Cuparkin o ' r { +' 6 The Markatplaoe r --,i Plan area Velloo Property Owner, LLC (90.82 ac4 + Simeon Properties (516 ao ) S C] KCR Propertiee (212 ao_j 3-19 This bridge functions as a publicly accessible space, with appropriate landscaping, restaurant and small retail kiosks as amenities. 3-20 Buildings are set back from the sidewalk enough for ground floor entries to face the street and provide landscaping and opportunities for people to interact along the streetscape. See Figure 3.28, 3.29 and 3.30 as examples on Page 3-21. Porches and frontage 3-23 Since this district has an employment focus, it is important to encourage and maintain public pedestrian access to key streets and open spaces serving the East Plaza. Active ground floor uses are in specific locations, mainly along Vallco Parkway and one block north of Vallco Parkway along Wolfe Road. Under Tier 2 and with community benefits, a single corporate user in the Office Mixed -Use District, may use bollards, gates or fencing at the interior street to reserve them for private access for security purposes, subject to the City's design review. Bollards, gates and fencing must be removable to revert back to public access in the event that the tenants become multi -users. The fences, bollards shall be artistically integrated subject to design review and shall be located in the private portion of the streets. The surrounding streets (Perimeter Road, frontage road along Wolfe Road and street around the East Plaza) and the East Plaza shall remain accessible to the public. Buildings in the office/mixed-use district are allowed to connect via overhead bridges, as long as the bridges are above the third story, subject to design review and so that the ground level streets are not substantially covered by the overhead bridges. CHAPTER 4 Page Edit 3-27 Civic and/or cultural uses, if provided, are in unique buildings and located in the Retail and Entertainment/Mixed-Use District and faee the S The existing wall and row of trees along the west Plan Area boundary is retained as and replaced as necessary,'tea CHAPTER 4 Page Edit 4-12 The key purpose of the TMA will be to help ef€iee usefs of the pr-ejeeimprove transportation choices in the Plan Area,-an4 6-14 achieve the target mode -share, and keep office users within the trip cap. Dimensions and location of each amenity such as sidewalks and CHAPTER 6 Page Edit 6-11 1 Required on any facade that exceeds 204-250 linear feet as measured along the adjacent sidewalk 6-14 All streets and intersections require review of fire and traffic safety and must be approved by the City and appropriate Fire Official. Dimensions and location of each amenity such as sidewalks and bicycle lanes/cycle tracks shown in street sections within this chapter shall be corrected to be consistent with City standards, City's Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans, and fire safety standards as applicable. 6-14 Eaeh Week as part ef the larger- par -eel ef w-hieh i part or-, it may be legally sttbdivided into a Fkeiv_�- 6-16 6.2.201.A.1 overall street width minimum 52-58 feet Planter & parking width 8 feet; parking and planters may share the 8 foot width in an alternating pattern along the length of the street as applicable. 6-17 6.2.201.A.2 Planter & parking width 8 feet; parking and planters may share the 8 foot width in an alternating pattern along the length of the street as applicable 6-24 & 6-25 Figure 6.2.201.B.5 Edit building graphic so that it shows max height 45 feet Minimum overall width is 56' from property line to building footprint, consistent with building heights figure. Delete cycle track and replace with multi-use path. Add footnote: east side varies to accommodate bicycle lanes and/or landscaping as applicable Sidewalk and planter location may alternate subject to city review for safety, best practices and consistency with Cupertino Bicycle/Pedestrian Plans. Figure 6.2.201.B.6 show existing trees and multi-use pathway on the east side. Delete "existing west side of street to remain." Bike lane should be labeled as C1 and Planter should be labeled as C2 6-27 6.2.202.B.1.a. Six (6) acres of publicly accessible open space are required within the Code Boundaries for the property identified as "B" Vallco Property owner LLC in Chapter 3.4 Development Program. Development applications from Simeon Properties or KCR shall be provide parkland consistent with the Cupertino Municipal Code. 6-29 Green bubbles along western property should be removed. Final locations of parks are not regulated here. Only general area of Town Square and East Plaza is identified. 6-36 6.2.203.1) Height adjacent to Town Square East Plaza 6-40 Building is allowed over porch. N4 allowed 6-40-to 6-47 In frontage descriptions, "adjacent" sidewalk should be deleted and replaced with "back of" sidewalk with graphic labeled accordingly 6-52 6.2.207.A Parking Spaces Requirements Residential market rate: as shown in table Deed-Restricted BMR housing units available to moderate, low, and very low income households: Minimum automobile parking requirement of 0.25 spaces/bedroom. Add "See CMC' " for all residential uses under the minimum requirement. New footnote: Parking minimum requirements may be further reduced pursuant to a parking study prepared in accordance with CMC 19.124.060. 6-55 Delete 3a, 3b and 3c and 4 6-67 High quality screening, compatible with architecture and surroundings 6-72 Delete existing definitions for Frontage, Private and Frontage, Public and replace with: CHAPTER 7 Page 1. Frontage, Private. The area between the building facade and sidewalk located within an internal area of the development along a private street and/or property line. 2. Frontage, Public. Building facade facing Stevens Creek Boulevard, North Wolfe Road and Vallco Parkway. 6-76 Setback, building. The mandatory clear distance between back of minimum sidewalk a let line and a building facade, consistent with 6.2.205 Frontages. CHAPTER 7 Page Edit 7-03 A Development Agreement may expedite procedures for consideration and issuance of permits and approvals within this Specific Plan. 7-04 Correct superscript footnotes to application type as follows: Note A moved below Public Meeting and above B Parcels north of current Perimeter Road — no superscript Transfers of Development Allocations K, L, o 7-08 Unless a Development Agreement is entered into that sets forth alternative expiration dates, approval on a permit shall become null and void and of no effect, upon expiration of the time frame specified in Table 7.1, unless a shorter or longer time period is prescribed in the conditions of the permit or gfeen nt, unless: 7-09 Last paragraph in the MSDP findings section should have a number 5. Clarification for the Specific Plan Page 3-45 Table 3.3 Tier 2 Development Program Notes: * 1. Minimum commercial/retail requirement — 400,000 sg.ft. 2. If civic/cultural space is built but not used by civic and cultural uses/public education facilities, the 85,000 square feet of space allocated for civic and cultural uses/public educational facilities may be converted into uses that qualify under 'minimum retail requirement' or incubator/ co -working/ maker spaces. GLOBAL: any reference to minimum planted areas in Chapter 6 regarding public parks and open spaces should be corrected to require 60% minimum planted areas and 40% maximum hardscape. Page 6-31, 6.2.202.A.2 Neighborhood Park B. General character Combination of hardscape (40% max. 6 n.) and planted areas (60% min.40% ma*) in formal patterns Page 6-32, 6.2.202.A.3 Neighborhood Park B. General character Combination of hardscape (40% max. 6 n.) and planted areas (60% min.40% ma*) in formal patterns